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DNA Damage and Repair in Epithelium after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

Hematology Division, BMT Unit, University Hospital of Patras, Rio 26500, Greece
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065, USA
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13(12), 15813-15825; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms131215813
Received: 19 October 2012 / Revised: 18 November 2012 / Accepted: 19 November 2012 / Published: 27 November 2012
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Damage and Repair in Degenerative Diseases)
Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in humans, following hematoablative treatment, results in biological chimeras. In this case, the transplanted hematopoietic, immune cells and their derivatives can be considered the donor genotype, while the other tissues are the recipient genotype. The first sequel, which has been recognized in the development of chimerical organisms after allo-HSCT, is the graft versus host (GvH) reaction, in which the new developed immune cells from the graft recognize the host’s epithelial cells as foreign and mount an inflammatory response to kill them. There is now accumulating evidence that this chronic inflammatory tissue stress may contribute to clinical consequences in the transplant recipient. It has been recently reported that host epithelial tissue acquire genomic alterations and display a mutator phenotype that may be linked to the occurrence of a GvH reaction. The current review discusses existing data on this recently discovered phenomenon and focuses on the possible pathogenesis, clinical significance and therapeutic implications. View Full-Text
Keywords: bone marrow transplantation; mismatch repair; microsatellite instability; graft-versus-host reaction bone marrow transplantation; mismatch repair; microsatellite instability; graft-versus-host reaction
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MDPI and ACS Style

Themeli, M.; Spyridonidis, A. DNA Damage and Repair in Epithelium after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2012, 13, 15813-15825. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms131215813

AMA Style

Themeli M, Spyridonidis A. DNA Damage and Repair in Epithelium after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2012; 13(12):15813-15825. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms131215813

Chicago/Turabian Style

Themeli, Maria, and Alexandros Spyridonidis. 2012. "DNA Damage and Repair in Epithelium after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 13, no. 12: 15813-15825. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms131215813

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