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Article

One Year Follow-Up Risk Assessment in SKH-1 Mice and Wounds Treated with an Argon Plasma Jet

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Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Departments of Plasma Life Science and ZIK Plasmatis, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald, Germany
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Department of Hygiene and Environmental Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, 17475 Greifswald, Germany
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Core Facility Multimodal Small Animal Imaging, 18057 Rostock, Germany
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Institute for Experimental Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69a, 18057 Rostock, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Allison Cowin
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 868; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040868
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 11 April 2017 / Accepted: 12 April 2017 / Published: 19 April 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wound Repair and Regeneration)
Multiple evidence in animal models and in humans suggest a beneficial role of cold physical plasma in wound treatment. Yet, risk assessment studies are important to further foster therapeutic advancement and acceptance of cold plasma in clinics. Accordingly, we investigated the longterm side effects of repetitive plasma treatment over 14 consecutive days in a rodent full-thickness ear wound model. Subsequently, animals were housed for 350 days and sacrificed thereafter. In blood, systemic changes of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and tumor necrosis factor α were absent. Similarly, tumor marker levels of α-fetoprotein and calcitonin remained unchanged. Using quantitative PCR, the expression levels of several cytokines and tumor markers in liver, lung, and skin were found to be similar in the control and treatment group as well. Likewise, histological and immunohistochemical analysis failed to detect abnormal morphological changes and the presence of tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen, α-fetoprotein, or the neighbor of Punc 11. Absence of neoplastic lesions was confirmed by non-invasive imaging methods such as anatomical magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Our results suggest that the beneficial effects of cold plasma in wound healing come without apparent side effects including tumor formation or chronic inflammation. View Full-Text
Keywords: dermal full-thickness wounds; kINPen plasma jet; plasma medicine; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; risk evaluation; SKH1 mouse model dermal full-thickness wounds; kINPen plasma jet; plasma medicine; reactive oxygen and nitrogen species; risk evaluation; SKH1 mouse model
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schmidt, A.; Woedtke, T.V.; Stenzel, J.; Lindner, T.; Polei, S.; Vollmar, B.; Bekeschus, S. One Year Follow-Up Risk Assessment in SKH-1 Mice and Wounds Treated with an Argon Plasma Jet. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 868. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040868

AMA Style

Schmidt A, Woedtke TV, Stenzel J, Lindner T, Polei S, Vollmar B, Bekeschus S. One Year Follow-Up Risk Assessment in SKH-1 Mice and Wounds Treated with an Argon Plasma Jet. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2017; 18(4):868. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040868

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schmidt, Anke, Thomas V. Woedtke, Jan Stenzel, Tobias Lindner, Stefan Polei, Brigitte Vollmar, and Sander Bekeschus. 2017. "One Year Follow-Up Risk Assessment in SKH-1 Mice and Wounds Treated with an Argon Plasma Jet" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18, no. 4: 868. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms18040868

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