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Article

Visualization of Tau–Tubulin Interaction in a Living Cell Using Bifluorescence Complementation Technique

1
Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Brain Science Institute, Convergence Research Center for Diagnosis, Treatment and Care System of Dementia, Seoul 02792, Korea
2
Department of Life Science, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
3
Department of Neuroscience, Wellesley College, Wellesley, MA 02481, USA
4
Division of Bio-Medical Science & Technology, University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejeon 34113, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(10), 2978; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19102978
Received: 17 August 2018 / Revised: 22 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Protein Folding)
Tau is a neuron-specific microtubule-binding protein that stabilizes microtubules. It is generally thought that highly phosphorylated tau dissociates from microtubules and becomes insoluble aggregates, leading to neuronal degeneration. Due to the implication of tau aggregation in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, great efforts have been made to identify the tau aggregation process. However, tau interaction with tubulin during the aggregation process remains largely unknown. To scrutinize the tau-tubulin interaction, we generated a cell model that enables visualization of the tau-tubulin interaction in a living cell using the Bifluorescence Complementation (BiFC) Technique. Upon diverse chemical stimulation that induced tau pathology, tau-tubulin BiFC cells showed significantly increased levels of BiFC fluorescence, indicating that tau aggregates together with tubulin. Our results suggest that tubulin should be considered as a key component in the tau aggregation process. View Full-Text
Keywords: tau aggregation; microtubule; tubulin; Bifluorescence Complementation; neurodegeneration tau aggregation; microtubule; tubulin; Bifluorescence Complementation; neurodegeneration
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shin, S.; Lim, S.; Jeong, H.; Kwan, L.T.; Kim, Y.K. Visualization of Tau–Tubulin Interaction in a Living Cell Using Bifluorescence Complementation Technique. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 2978. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19102978

AMA Style

Shin S, Lim S, Jeong H, Kwan LT, Kim YK. Visualization of Tau–Tubulin Interaction in a Living Cell Using Bifluorescence Complementation Technique. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2018; 19(10):2978. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19102978

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shin, Seulgi, Sungsu Lim, Hyeanjeong Jeong, Li T. Kwan, and Yun K. Kim 2018. "Visualization of Tau–Tubulin Interaction in a Living Cell Using Bifluorescence Complementation Technique" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 19, no. 10: 2978. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms19102978

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