Next Article in Journal
An Omics Approach to Diagnosing or Investigating Fungal Keratitis
Next Article in Special Issue
Ascaroside Pheromones: Chemical Biology and Pleiotropic Neuronal Functions
Previous Article in Journal
Ocular-Component-Specific miRNA Expression in a Murine Model of Lens-Induced Myopia
Previous Article in Special Issue
Elucidation of the Molecular Mechanism Underlying Lippia citriodora(Lim.)-Induced Relaxation and Anti-Depression
Review

Function of Green Tea Catechins in the Brain: Epigallocatechin Gallate and its Metabolites

1
Tea Science Center, Graduate School of Integrated Pharmaceutical and Nutritional Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka 422-8526, Japan
2
R&D group, Mitsui Norin Co. Ltd., Shizuoka 426-0133, Japan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(15), 3630; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20153630
Received: 3 July 2019 / Revised: 22 July 2019 / Accepted: 22 July 2019 / Published: 25 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Natural Products and Neuroprotection)
Over the last three decades, green tea has been studied for its beneficial effects, including anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-diabetes, anti-inflammatory, and neuroprotective effects. At present, a number of studies that have employed animal, human and cell cultures support the potential neuroprotective effects of green tea catechins against neurological disorders. However, the concentration of (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) in systemic circulation is very low and EGCG disappears within several hours. EGCG undergoes microbial degradation in the small intestine and later in the large intestine, resulting in the formation of various microbial ring-fission metabolites which are detectable in the plasma and urine as free and conjugated forms. Recently, in vitro experiments suggested that EGCG and its metabolites could reach the brain parenchyma through the blood–brain barrier and induce neuritogenesis. These results suggest that metabolites of EGCG may play an important role, alongside the beneficial activities of EGCG, in reducing neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we discuss the function of EGCG and its microbial ring-fission metabolites in the brain in suppressing brain dysfunction. Other possible actions of EGCG metabolites will also be discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: blood–brain barrier; catechin; cognition; epigallocatechin gallate; green tea; microbiota; 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone blood–brain barrier; catechin; cognition; epigallocatechin gallate; green tea; microbiota; 5-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Pervin, M.; Unno, K.; Takagaki, A.; Isemura, M.; Nakamura, Y. Function of Green Tea Catechins in the Brain: Epigallocatechin Gallate and its Metabolites. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20, 3630. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20153630

AMA Style

Pervin M, Unno K, Takagaki A, Isemura M, Nakamura Y. Function of Green Tea Catechins in the Brain: Epigallocatechin Gallate and its Metabolites. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2019; 20(15):3630. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20153630

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pervin, Monira, Keiko Unno, Akiko Takagaki, Mamoru Isemura, and Yoriyuki Nakamura. 2019. "Function of Green Tea Catechins in the Brain: Epigallocatechin Gallate and its Metabolites" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20, no. 15: 3630. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms20153630

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop