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The Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency Responses in Rice

by 1,†, 2 and 1,*
1
State Key Laboratory of Vegetation and Environmental Change, Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China
2
Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biotechnology for Plant Development, School of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: College of Horticulture, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(1), 43; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21010043
Received: 2 November 2019 / Revised: 15 December 2019 / Accepted: 17 December 2019 / Published: 19 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ion Transport and Homeostasis in Plants)
Iron (Fe) is an essential element required for plant growth and development. Under Fe-deficientconditions, plants have developed two distinct strategies (designated as strategy I and II) to acquire Fe from soil. As a graminaceous species, rice is not a typical strategy II plant, as it not only synthesizes DMA (2’-deoxymugineic acid) in roots to chelate Fe3+ but also acquires Fe2+ through transporters OsIRT1 and OsIRT2. During the synthesis of DMA in rice, there are three sequential enzymatic reactions catalyzed by enzymes NAS (nicotianamine synthase), NAAT (nicotianamine aminotransferase), and DMAS (deoxymugineic acid synthase). Many transporters required for Fe uptake from the rhizosphere and internal translocation have also been identified in rice. In addition, the signaling networks composed of various transcription factors (such as IDEF1, IDEF2, and members of the bHLH (basic helix-loop-helix) family), phytohormones, and signaling molecules are demonstrated to regulate Fe uptake and translocation. This knowledge greatly contributes to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying iron deficiency responses in rice. View Full-Text
Keywords: rice (Oryza sativa), Fe deficiency; strategy II; Fe acquisition; transporters; transcription factors; phytohormones rice (Oryza sativa), Fe deficiency; strategy II; Fe acquisition; transporters; transcription factors; phytohormones
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, Q.; Chen, L.; Yang, A. The Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency Responses in Rice. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21010043

AMA Style

Li Q, Chen L, Yang A. The Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency Responses in Rice. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(1):43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21010043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Qian, Lei Chen, and An Yang. 2020. "The Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Iron Deficiency Responses in Rice" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 1: 43. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21010043

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