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Metabolic and Vascular Effect of the Mediterranean Diet
Review

Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection

1
Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro 21040-900, Brazil
2
Programa de Neurociências da Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói 24020-141, Brazil
3
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Rio de Janeiro 21040-900, Brazil
4
Laboratório de Imunofarmacologia, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO), Rio de Janeiro 20210-010, Brazil
5
Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Molecular e Celular, UNIRIO, Rio de Janeiro 20210-010, Brazil
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(12), 4489; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21124489
Received: 31 December 2019 / Revised: 5 February 2020 / Accepted: 15 February 2020 / Published: 24 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolic and Vascular Effects of Mediterranean Diet)
The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) consists of consumption of vegetables and healthy oils and have beneficial effects on metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Our goal here is to discuss the role of fatty acid content in MedDiet, mostly omega-3, omega-6, and omega-9 on malaria. Malaria affects millions of people around the globe. The parasite Plasmodium causes the disease. The metabolic and inflammatory alterations in the severe forms have damaging consequences to the host. The lipid content in the MedDiet holds anti-inflammatory and pro-resolutive features in the host and have detrimental effects on the Plasmodium. The lipids from the diet impact the balance of pro- and anti-inflammation, thus, lipids intake from the diet is critical to parasite elimination and host tissue damage caused by an immune response. Herein, we go into the cellular and molecular mechanisms and targets of the MedDiet fatty acids in the host and the parasite, reviewing potential benefits of the MedDiet, on inflammation, malaria infection progression, and clinical outcome. View Full-Text
Keywords: mediterranean diet; fatty acid; omega-3; omega-6; omega-9; inflammation; malaria mediterranean diet; fatty acid; omega-3; omega-6; omega-9; inflammation; malaria
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MDPI and ACS Style

Silva, A.R.; Moraes, B.P.T.; Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, C.F. Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 4489. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21124489

AMA Style

Silva AR, Moraes BPT, Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque CF. Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(12):4489. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21124489

Chicago/Turabian Style

Silva, Adriana R., Bianca P.T. Moraes, and Cassiano F. Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque 2020. "Mediterranean Diet: Lipids, Inflammation, and Malaria Infection" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 12: 4489. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21124489

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