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Review

The Body’s Cellular and Molecular Response to Protein-Coated Medical Device Implants: A Review Focused on Fibronectin and BMP Proteins

1
Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD 20993, USA
2
Celigenex, Inc., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8853; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228853
Received: 5 October 2020 / Revised: 18 November 2020 / Accepted: 19 November 2020 / Published: 23 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Feature Papers in Materials Science)
Recent years have seen a marked rise in implantation into the body of a great variety of devices: hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, pacemakers, meshes, glucose sensors, and many others. Cochlear and retinal implants are being developed to restore hearing and sight. After surgery to implant a device, adjacent cells interact with the implant and release molecular signals that result in attraction, infiltration of the tissue, and attachment to the implant of various cell types including monocytes, macrophages, and platelets. These cells release additional signaling molecules (chemokines and cytokines) that recruit tissue repair cells to the device site. Some implants fail and require additional revision surgery that is traumatic for the patient and expensive for the payer. This review examines the literature for evidence to support the possibility that fibronectins and BMPs could be coated on the implants as part of the manufacturing process so that the proteins could be released into the tissue surrounding the implant and improve the rate of successful implantation. View Full-Text
Keywords: hip; shoulder; implants; FN; protein; cytokines; neutrophils; macrophages; osteogenesis; titanium hip; shoulder; implants; FN; protein; cytokines; neutrophils; macrophages; osteogenesis; titanium
MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, Y.-F.; Goodheart, C.; Rua, D. The Body’s Cellular and Molecular Response to Protein-Coated Medical Device Implants: A Review Focused on Fibronectin and BMP Proteins. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 8853. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228853

AMA Style

Chen Y-F, Goodheart C, Rua D. The Body’s Cellular and Molecular Response to Protein-Coated Medical Device Implants: A Review Focused on Fibronectin and BMP Proteins. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(22):8853. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228853

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Yi-Fan, Clyde Goodheart, and Diego Rua. 2020. "The Body’s Cellular and Molecular Response to Protein-Coated Medical Device Implants: A Review Focused on Fibronectin and BMP Proteins" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 22: 8853. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228853

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