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Article

Cardioprotection via Metabolism for Rat Heart Preservation Using the High-Pressure Gaseous Mixture of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

1
Department of Anatomy, Aichi Medical University, Aichi 480-1195, Japan
2
Department of Legal Medicine, Aichi Medical University, Aichi 480-1195, Japan
3
Department of Surgery, Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(22), 8858; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228858
Received: 26 October 2020 / Revised: 16 November 2020 / Accepted: 19 November 2020 / Published: 23 November 2020
The high-pressure gas (HPG) method with carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2) mixture maintains the preserved rat heart function. The metabolites of rat hearts preserved using the HPG method (HPG group) and cold storage (CS) method (CS group) by immersion in a stock solution for 24 h were assessed to confirm CO and O2 effects. Lactic acid was significantly lower and citric acid was significantly higher in the HPG group than in the CS group. Moreover, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels as well as some pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) metabolites and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) were significantly higher in the HPG group than in the CS group. Additionally, reduced glutathione (GSH), which protects cells from oxidative stress, was also significantly higher in the HPG group than in the CS group. These results indicated that each gas, CO and O2, induced the shift from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism, maintaining the energy of ischemic preserved organs, shifting the glucose utilization from glycolysis toward PPP, and reducing oxidative stress. Both CO and O2 in the HPG method have important effects on the ATP supply and decrease oxidative stress for preventing ischemic injury. The HPG method may be useful for clinical application. View Full-Text
Keywords: cardioprotection; ischemic injury; metabolomics; carbon monoxide; oxygen; high-pressure gas; transplantation; rat cardioprotection; ischemic injury; metabolomics; carbon monoxide; oxygen; high-pressure gas; transplantation; rat
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MDPI and ACS Style

Suzuki, C.; Hatayama, N.; Ogawa, T.; Nanizawa, E.; Otsuka, S.; Hata, K.; Seno, H.; Naito, M.; Hirai, S. Cardioprotection via Metabolism for Rat Heart Preservation Using the High-Pressure Gaseous Mixture of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 8858. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228858

AMA Style

Suzuki C, Hatayama N, Ogawa T, Nanizawa E, Otsuka S, Hata K, Seno H, Naito M, Hirai S. Cardioprotection via Metabolism for Rat Heart Preservation Using the High-Pressure Gaseous Mixture of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(22):8858. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228858

Chicago/Turabian Style

Suzuki, Chiharu, Naoyuki Hatayama, Tadashi Ogawa, Eri Nanizawa, Shun Otsuka, Koichiro Hata, Hiroshi Seno, Munekazu Naito, and Shuichi Hirai. 2020. "Cardioprotection via Metabolism for Rat Heart Preservation Using the High-Pressure Gaseous Mixture of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 22: 8858. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21228858

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