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Article

Acceleration of Carbon Fixation in Chilling-Sensitive Banana under Mild and Moderate Chilling Stresses

1
Department of Pomology, College of Horticulture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
Centre of the Region Haná for Biotechnological and Agricultural Research, Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 783 71 Olomouc, Czech Republic
3
Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Tropical and Subtropical Fruit Tree Research, Institute of Fruit Tree Research, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(23), 9326; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21239326
Received: 31 October 2020 / Revised: 27 November 2020 / Accepted: 28 November 2020 / Published: 7 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Molecular Genetics and Genomics)
Banana is one of the most important food and fruit crops in the world and its growth is ceasing at 10–17 °C. However, the mechanisms determining the tolerance of banana to mild (>15 °C) and moderate chilling (10–15 °C) are elusive. Furthermore, the biochemical controls over the photosynthesis in tropical plant species at low temperatures above 10 °C is not well understood. The purpose of this research was to reveal the response of chilling-sensitive banana to mild (16 °C) and moderate chilling stress (10 °C) at the molecular (transcripts, proteins) and physiological levels. The results showed different transcriptome responses between mild and moderate chilling stresses, especially in pathways of plant hormone signal transduction, ABC transporters, ubiquinone, and other terpenoid-quinone biosynthesis. Interestingly, functions related to carbon fixation were assigned preferentially to upregulated genes/proteins, while photosynthesis and photosynthesis-antenna proteins were downregulated at 10 °C, as revealed by both digital gene expression and proteomic analysis. These results were confirmed by qPCR and immunofluorescence labeling methods. Conclusion: Banana responded to the mild chilling stress dramatically at the molecular level. To compensate for the decreased photosynthesis efficiency caused by mild and moderate chilling stresses, banana accelerated its carbon fixation, mainly through upregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases. View Full-Text
Keywords: banana (Musa spp. AAA); mild chilling; carbon fixation; photosynthesis; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases; immunofluorescence labeling banana (Musa spp. AAA); mild chilling; carbon fixation; photosynthesis; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases; immunofluorescence labeling
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, J.; Takáč, T.; Yi, G.; Chen, H.; Wang, Y.; Meng, J.; Yuan, W.; Tan, Y.; Ning, T.; He, Z.; Šamaj, J.; Xu, C. Acceleration of Carbon Fixation in Chilling-Sensitive Banana under Mild and Moderate Chilling Stresses. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 9326. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21239326

AMA Style

Liu J, Takáč T, Yi G, Chen H, Wang Y, Meng J, Yuan W, Tan Y, Ning T, He Z, Šamaj J, Xu C. Acceleration of Carbon Fixation in Chilling-Sensitive Banana under Mild and Moderate Chilling Stresses. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(23):9326. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21239326

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Jing, Tomáš Takáč, Ganjun Yi, Houbin Chen, Yingying Wang, Jian Meng, Weina Yuan, Yehuan Tan, Tong Ning, Zhenting He, Jozef Šamaj, and Chunxiang Xu. 2020. "Acceleration of Carbon Fixation in Chilling-Sensitive Banana under Mild and Moderate Chilling Stresses" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 23: 9326. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21239326

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