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Communication

Exploring miR-9 Involvement in Ciona intestinalis Neural Development Using Peptide Nucleic Acids

1
Department of Environmental Science and Policy, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
2
Department of Chemistry, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
3
Department of Earth Science, Environment and Life, Università degli Studi di Genova, 16132 Genova, Italy
4
Department of Biosciences, Università degli Studi di Milano, 20133 Milano, Italy
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(6), 2001; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21062001
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 12 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 15 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Designer Biopolymers: Self-Assembling Proteins and Nucleic Acids 2020)
The microRNAs are small RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and can be involved in the onset of neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. They are emerging as possible targets for antisense-based therapy, even though the in vivo stability of miRNA analogues is still questioned. We tested the ability of peptide nucleic acids, a novel class of nucleic acid mimics, to downregulate miR-9 in vivo in an invertebrate model organism, the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, by microinjection of antisense molecules in the eggs. It is known that miR-9 is a well-conserved microRNA in bilaterians and we found that it is expressed in epidermal sensory neurons of the tail in the larva of C. intestinalis. Larvae developed from injected eggs showed a reduced differentiation of tail neurons, confirming the possibility to use peptide nucleic acid PNA to downregulate miRNA in a whole organism. By identifying putative targets of miR-9, we discuss the role of this miRNA in the development of the peripheral nervous system of ascidians. View Full-Text
Keywords: PNA; antisense therapy; invertebrate; nervous system development; tunicates; microRNA PNA; antisense therapy; invertebrate; nervous system development; tunicates; microRNA
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mercurio, S.; Cauteruccio, S.; Manenti, R.; Candiani, S.; Scarì, G.; Licandro, E.; Pennati, R. Exploring miR-9 Involvement in Ciona intestinalis Neural Development Using Peptide Nucleic Acids. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2001. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21062001

AMA Style

Mercurio S, Cauteruccio S, Manenti R, Candiani S, Scarì G, Licandro E, Pennati R. Exploring miR-9 Involvement in Ciona intestinalis Neural Development Using Peptide Nucleic Acids. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(6):2001. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21062001

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mercurio, Silvia, Silvia Cauteruccio, Raoul Manenti, Simona Candiani, Giorgio Scarì, Emanuela Licandro, and Roberta Pennati. 2020. "Exploring miR-9 Involvement in Ciona intestinalis Neural Development Using Peptide Nucleic Acids" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 21, no. 6: 2001. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21062001

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