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Review

Genes and Diet in the Prevention of Chronic Diseases in Future Generations

1
Department of Medicine and Aging, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, ‘G. d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
2
Center for Advanced Studies and Technology (CAST), ‘G. d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
3
DISC-Diversified Integrated Sport Clinic, Dubai 00000, UAE
4
Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, ‘G. d’Annunzio’ University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(7), 2633; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072633
Received: 19 March 2020 / Revised: 30 March 2020 / Accepted: 8 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Epigenetics of Diabetes and Related Complications)
Nutrition is a modifiable key factor that is able to interact with both the genome and epigenome to influence human health and fertility. In particular, specific genetic variants can influence the response to dietary components and nutrient requirements, and conversely, the diet itself is able to modulate gene expression. In this context and the era of precision medicine, nutrigenetic and nutrigenomic studies offer significant opportunities to improve the prevention of metabolic disturbances, such as Type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular diseases, even with transgenerational effects. The present review takes into account the interactions between diet, genes and human health, and provides an overview of the role of nutrigenetics, nutrigenomics and epigenetics in the prevention of non-communicable diseases. Moreover, we focus our attention on the mechanism of intergenerational or transgenerational transmission of the susceptibility to metabolic disturbances, and underline that the reversibility of epigenetic modifications through dietary intervention could counteract perturbations induced by lifestyle and environmental factors. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrigenetics; nutrigenomics; epigenetics; gene-nutrient interaction; transgenerational effect; non-communicable diseases nutrigenetics; nutrigenomics; epigenetics; gene-nutrient interaction; transgenerational effect; non-communicable diseases
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MDPI and ACS Style

Franzago, M.; Santurbano, D.; Vitacolonna, E.; Stuppia, L. Genes and Diet in the Prevention of Chronic Diseases in Future Generations. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2633. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072633

AMA Style

Franzago M, Santurbano D, Vitacolonna E, Stuppia L. Genes and Diet in the Prevention of Chronic Diseases in Future Generations. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(7):2633. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072633

Chicago/Turabian Style

Franzago, Marica; Santurbano, Daniele; Vitacolonna, Ester; Stuppia, Liborio. 2020. "Genes and Diet in the Prevention of Chronic Diseases in Future Generations" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 7: 2633. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072633

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