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Article

Underlying Ossification Phenotype in a Murine Model of Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma

1
Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201, USA
2
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences & Public Health, Tarleton State University, Fort Worth, TX 76104, USA
3
Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA
4
Departments of Orthopaedics and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(7), 2636; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072636
Received: 22 February 2020 / Revised: 28 March 2020 / Accepted: 6 April 2020 / Published: 10 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cancer Cell Reprogramming)
Synovial sarcoma, an uncommon cancer, typically affects young adults. Survival rates range from 36% to 76%, decreasing significantly when metastases are present. Synovial sarcomas form in soft tissues, often near bones, with about 10% demonstrating ossification in the tumor. The literature is inconclusive on whether the presence of ossification portends a worse prognosis. To this end, we analyzed our genetic mouse models of synovial sarcoma to determine the extent of ossification in the tumors and its relationship with morbidity. We noted higher ossification within our metastatic mouse model of synovial sarcoma. Not only did we observe ossification within the tumors at a frequency of 7%, but an even higher frequency, 72%, of bone reactivity was detected by radiography. An enrichment of bone development genes was associated with primary tumors, even in the absence of an ossification phenotype. In spite of the ossification being intricately linked with the metastatic model, the presence of ossification was not associated with a faster or worse morbidity in the mice. Our conclusion is that both metastasis and ossification are dependent on time, but that they are independent of one another. View Full-Text
Keywords: synovial sarcoma; metastasis; heterotopic ossification; bone development genes; inflammation; intralesional calcification; parathyroid hormone-like hormone synovial sarcoma; metastasis; heterotopic ossification; bone development genes; inflammation; intralesional calcification; parathyroid hormone-like hormone
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kirkham, M.; Kalivas, A.; Fatema, K.; Luelling, S.; Dubansky, B.H.; Dubansky, B.; Jones, K.B.; Barrott, J.J. Underlying Ossification Phenotype in a Murine Model of Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072636

AMA Style

Kirkham M, Kalivas A, Fatema K, Luelling S, Dubansky BH, Dubansky B, Jones KB, Barrott JJ. Underlying Ossification Phenotype in a Murine Model of Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(7):2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072636

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kirkham, Matthew; Kalivas, Austen; Fatema, Kaniz; Luelling, Sarah; Dubansky, Brooke H.; Dubansky, Benjamin; Jones, Kevin B.; Barrott, Jared J. 2020. "Underlying Ossification Phenotype in a Murine Model of Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 7: 2636. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms21072636

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