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Using Budding Yeast to Identify Molecules That Block Cancer Cell ‘Mitotic Slippage’ Only in the Presence of Mitotic Poisons

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
2
Division of Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kwei-Shan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Vitor Teixeira
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 7985; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22157985
Received: 29 June 2021 / Revised: 20 July 2021 / Accepted: 23 July 2021 / Published: 26 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Cell Signalling Pathways)
Research on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has yielded fundamental discoveries on highly conserved biological pathways and yeast remains the best-studied eukaryotic cell in the world. Studies on the mitotic cell cycle and the discovery of cell cycle checkpoints in budding yeast has led to a detailed, although incomplete, understanding of eukaryotic cell cycle progression. In multicellular eukaryotic organisms, uncontrolled aberrant cell division is the defining feature of cancer. Some of the most successful classes of anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agents are mitotic poisons. Mitotic poisons are thought to function by inducing a mitotic spindle checkpoint-dependent cell cycle arrest, via the assembly of the highly conserved mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), leading to apoptosis. Even in the presence of mitotic poisons, some cancer cells continue cell division via ‘mitotic slippage’, which may correlate with a cancer becoming refractory to mitotic poison chemotherapeutic treatments. In this review, knowledge about budding yeast cell cycle control is explored to suggest novel potential drug targets, namely, specific regions in the highly conserved anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) subunits Apc1 and/or Apc5, and in a specific N-terminal region in the APC/C co-factor cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20), which may yield molecules which block ‘mitotic slippage’ only in the presence of mitotic poisons. View Full-Text
Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae; budding yeast; cancer; cell cycle; mitosis; spindle assembly checkpoint; anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20); mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) Saccharomyces cerevisiae; budding yeast; cancer; cell cycle; mitosis; spindle assembly checkpoint; anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C); cell division cycle 20 (Cdc20); mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schuyler, S.C.; Chen, H.-Y. Using Budding Yeast to Identify Molecules That Block Cancer Cell ‘Mitotic Slippage’ Only in the Presence of Mitotic Poisons. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 7985. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22157985

AMA Style

Schuyler SC, Chen H-Y. Using Budding Yeast to Identify Molecules That Block Cancer Cell ‘Mitotic Slippage’ Only in the Presence of Mitotic Poisons. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(15):7985. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22157985

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schuyler, Scott C., and Hsin-Yu Chen. 2021. "Using Budding Yeast to Identify Molecules That Block Cancer Cell ‘Mitotic Slippage’ Only in the Presence of Mitotic Poisons" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 15: 7985. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22157985

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