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Article

Behavioral and Physiological Plasticity Provides Insights into Molecular Based Adaptation Mechanism to Strain Shift in Spodoptera frugiperda

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State Key Laboratory for Managing Biotic and Chemical Threats to the Quality and Safety of Agro-Products, Institute of Plant Protection and Microbiology, Zhejiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hangzhou 310021, China
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State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology, Institute of Insect Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
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Department of Entomology, College of Plant Protection, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
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Key Laboratory of Bio-Pesticide Innovation and Application, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
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State Key Laboratory of Ecological Pest Control for Fujian and Taiwan Crops, Key Lab of Biopesticide and Chemical Biology, Ministry of Education & Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Insect Ecology, College of Plant Protection, Fujian Agriculture and Forest University, Fuzhou 350002, China
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Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB, UK
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School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Massimo Maffei
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(19), 10284; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910284
Received: 24 August 2021 / Revised: 19 September 2021 / Accepted: 21 September 2021 / Published: 24 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Research in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses)
How herbivorous insects adapt to host plants is a key question in ecological and evolutionary biology. The fall armyworm, (FAW) Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), although polyphagous and a major pest on various crops, has been reported to have a rice and corn (maize) feeding strain in its native range in the Americas. The species is highly invasive and has recently established in China. We compared behavioral changes in larvae and adults of a corn population (Corn) when selected on rice (Rice) and the molecular basis of these adaptational changes in midgut and antennae based on a comparative transcriptome analysis. Larvae of S. frugiperda reared on rice plants continuously for 20 generations exhibited strong feeding preference for with higher larval performance and pupal weight on rice than on maize plants. Similarly, females from the rice selected population laid significantly more eggs on rice as compared to females from maize population. The most highly expressed DEGs were shown in the midgut of Rice vs. Corn. A total of 6430 DEGs were identified between the populations mostly in genes related to digestion and detoxification. These results suggest that potential adaptations for feeding on rice crops, may contribute to the current rapid spread of fall armyworm on rice crops in China and potentially elsewhere. Consistently, highly expressed DEGs were also shown in antennae; a total of 5125 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) s were identified related to the expansions of major chemosensory genes family in Rice compared to the Corn feeding population. These results not only provide valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms in host plants adaptation of S. frugiperda but may provide new gene targets for the management of this pest. View Full-Text
Keywords: midgut; antennal response; host plants adaptation; molecular mechanism; Spodoptera frugiperda; behavioral response midgut; antennal response; host plants adaptation; molecular mechanism; Spodoptera frugiperda; behavioral response
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hafeez, M.; Li, X.; Ullah, F.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J.; Huang, J.; Khan, M.M.; Chen, L.; Ren, X.; Zhou, S.; Fernández-Grandon, G.M.; Zalucki, M.P.; Lu, Y. Behavioral and Physiological Plasticity Provides Insights into Molecular Based Adaptation Mechanism to Strain Shift in Spodoptera frugiperda. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 10284. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910284

AMA Style

Hafeez M, Li X, Ullah F, Zhang Z, Zhang J, Huang J, Khan MM, Chen L, Ren X, Zhou S, Fernández-Grandon GM, Zalucki MP, Lu Y. Behavioral and Physiological Plasticity Provides Insights into Molecular Based Adaptation Mechanism to Strain Shift in Spodoptera frugiperda. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(19):10284. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910284

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hafeez, Muhammad, Xiaowei Li, Farman Ullah, Zhijun Zhang, Jinming Zhang, Jun Huang, Muhammad M. Khan, Limin Chen, Xiaoyun Ren, Shuxing Zhou, G. M. Fernández-Grandon, Myron P. Zalucki, and Yaobin Lu. 2021. "Behavioral and Physiological Plasticity Provides Insights into Molecular Based Adaptation Mechanism to Strain Shift in Spodoptera frugiperda" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 19: 10284. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms221910284

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