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Review

Understanding Plant Social Networking System: Avoiding Deleterious Microbiota but Calling Beneficials

1
Biotechnology Research Institute, College of Natural Sciences, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 28644, Korea
2
Molecular Phytobacteriology Laboratory, Infection Disease Research Center, KRIBB, Daejeon 34141, Korea
3
Biosystem and Bioengineering Program, University of Science and Technology (UST) KRIBB School, Daejeon 34141, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jan Schirawski
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(7), 3319; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22073319
Received: 21 January 2021 / Revised: 9 March 2021 / Accepted: 19 March 2021 / Published: 24 March 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Microbe Interaction 4.0)
Plant association with microorganisms elicits dramatic effects on the local phytobiome and often causes systemic and transgenerational modulation on plant immunity against insect pests and microbial pathogens. Previously, we introduced the concept of the plant social networking system (pSNS) to highlight the active involvement of plants in the recruitment of potentially beneficial microbiota upon exposure to insects and pathogens. Microbial association stimulates the physiological responses of plants and induces the development of their immune mechanisms while interacting with multiple enemies. Thus, beneficial microbes serve as important mediators of interactions among multiple members of the multitrophic, microscopic and macroscopic communities. In this review, we classify the steps of pSNS such as elicitation, signaling, secreting root exudates, and plant protection; summarize, with evidence, how plants and beneficial microbes communicate with each other; and also discuss how the molecular mechanisms underlying this communication are induced in plants exposed to natural enemies. Collectively, the pSNS modulates robustness of plant physiology and immunity and promotes survival potential by helping plants to overcome the environmental and biological challenges. View Full-Text
Keywords: beneficial microbiota; communication; multitrophic interaction; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; plant social networking system beneficial microbiota; communication; multitrophic interaction; plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; plant social networking system
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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, Y.-S.; Ryu, C.-M. Understanding Plant Social Networking System: Avoiding Deleterious Microbiota but Calling Beneficials. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 3319. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22073319

AMA Style

Park Y-S, Ryu C-M. Understanding Plant Social Networking System: Avoiding Deleterious Microbiota but Calling Beneficials. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(7):3319. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22073319

Chicago/Turabian Style

Park, Yong-Soon, and Choong-Min Ryu. 2021. "Understanding Plant Social Networking System: Avoiding Deleterious Microbiota but Calling Beneficials" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 7: 3319. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22073319

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