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Review

Physiologically Active Molecules and Functional Properties of Soybeans in Human Health—A Current Perspective

1
Advanced Bio-resource Research Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566, Korea
2
Molecular and Cellular Glycobiology Unit, Department of Biological Sciences, SungKyunKwan University, Gyunggi-Do 16419, Korea
3
Samsung Advanced Institute of Health Science and Technology, Gyunggi-Do 16419, Korea
4
Nodaji Co., Ltd., Pohang, Gyeongsangbuk-Do 37927, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Francesca Giampieri
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(8), 4054; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084054
Received: 13 March 2021 / Revised: 10 April 2021 / Accepted: 12 April 2021 / Published: 14 April 2021
In addition to providing nutrients, food can help prevent and treat certain diseases. In particular, research on soy products has increased dramatically following their emergence as functional foods capable of improving blood circulation and intestinal regulation. In addition to their nutritional value, soybeans contain specific phytochemical substances that promote health and are a source of dietary fiber, phospholipids, isoflavones (e.g., genistein and daidzein), phenolic acids, saponins, and phytic acid, while serving as a trypsin inhibitor. These individual substances have demonstrated effectiveness in preventing chronic diseases, such as arteriosclerosis, cardiac diseases, diabetes, and senile dementia, as well as in treating cancer and suppressing osteoporosis. Furthermore, soybean can affect fibrinolytic activity, control blood pressure, and improve lipid metabolism, while eliciting antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic, and antibacterial effects. In this review, rather than to improve on the established studies on the reported nutritional qualities of soybeans, we intend to examine the physiological activities of soybeans that have recently been studied and confirm their potential as a high-functional, well-being food. View Full-Text
Keywords: soybean; active molecules; soy functionality; health benefit soybean; active molecules; soy functionality; health benefit
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, I.-S.; Kim, C.-H.; Yang, W.-S. Physiologically Active Molecules and Functional Properties of Soybeans in Human Health—A Current Perspective. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 4054. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084054

AMA Style

Kim I-S, Kim C-H, Yang W-S. Physiologically Active Molecules and Functional Properties of Soybeans in Human Health—A Current Perspective. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(8):4054. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Il-Sup, Cheorl-Ho Kim, and Woong-Suk Yang. 2021. "Physiologically Active Molecules and Functional Properties of Soybeans in Human Health—A Current Perspective" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 8: 4054. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijms22084054

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