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Article

Analysis of Functional Recovery and Subjective Well-Being after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair

1
Department of Rehabilitation, Physical and Sports Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Santariskiu g.2, LT-08661 Vilnius, Lithuania
2
Department of Biomechanical Engineering, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, J. Basanaviciaus Str. 28, 03224 Vilnius, Lithuania
3
Rehabilitation Department, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Eiveniu Str. 2, LT-50161 Kaunas, Lithuania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose Antonio de Paz
Received: 8 June 2021 / Revised: 2 July 2021 / Accepted: 13 July 2021 / Published: 15 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Sports Medicine)
Background: Rotator cuff tears are common causes of functional shoulder instability and often lead to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A well-programmed rehabilitation leads to successful tendon healing, positive functional recovery and subjective well-being (SWB). Objective: To evaluate the changes in shoulder functioning and SWB pre-, post-outpatient rehabilitation and after one-month follow-up. Materials and Methods: A total of 44 patients were assessed three times: at the beginning (six weeks’ post-surgery), at the end of outpatient rehabilitation (2–3 weeks) and one month after rehabilitation. The outcome measures were the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH), active range of motion (ROM), manual muscle testing (MMT), hand dynamometry (HD) and pain level by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). SWB was assessed by Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSES), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and the Lithuanian Psychological Well-Being Scale (LPWBS). Results are presented as a difference between periods. Results: Affected shoulder motor function (MMT, HD and ROM) significantly improved in three periods (p < 0.05); however, major recovery was observed in the follow-up period. VAS scores meaningfully decreased over all stages and negatively correlated with motor function recovery (p < 0.05). DASH rates exhibited significant retrieval in all phases, especially in follow-up. SWB results demonstrated the larger effects of self-evaluation in follow-up, improved daily functions and psychological wellness, then negative emotions significantly decreased (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The experienced pain and psychosocial factors significantly influence functional recovery of the shoulder during rehabilitation. The improvement in motor function, ability and pain relief during rehabilitation increases level of SWB, psychological wellness and positive emotional affect in long-term context. View Full-Text
Keywords: rotator cuff repair; hand motor function; rehabilitation; subjective well-being; long-term context rotator cuff repair; hand motor function; rehabilitation; subjective well-being; long-term context
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MDPI and ACS Style

Adomavičienė, A.; Daunoravičienė, K.; Šidlauskaitė, R.; Griškevičius, J.; Kubilius, R.; Varžaitytė, L.; Raistenskis, J. Analysis of Functional Recovery and Subjective Well-Being after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair. Medicina 2021, 57, 715. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina57070715

AMA Style

Adomavičienė A, Daunoravičienė K, Šidlauskaitė R, Griškevičius J, Kubilius R, Varžaitytė L, Raistenskis J. Analysis of Functional Recovery and Subjective Well-Being after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair. Medicina. 2021; 57(7):715. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina57070715

Chicago/Turabian Style

Adomavičienė, Aušra, Kristina Daunoravičienė, Rusnė Šidlauskaitė, Julius Griškevičius, Raimondas Kubilius, Lina Varžaitytė, and Juozas Raistenskis. 2021. "Analysis of Functional Recovery and Subjective Well-Being after Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair" Medicina 57, no. 7: 715. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/medicina57070715

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