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Article

Immobilization of Lead Migrating from Contaminated Soil in Rhizosphere Soil of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Using Hydroxyapatite

1
Department of Agricultural Chemistry, School of Agriculture, Meiji University, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571, Japan
2
Department of Civil Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193, Japan
3
Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1273; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph14101273
Received: 11 September 2017 / Revised: 18 October 2017 / Accepted: 20 October 2017 / Published: 23 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil Pollution and Public Health)
This study conducted plant growth tests using a rhizobox system to quantitatively determine the distance of immobilization lead migrating from contaminated soil into uncontaminated rhizosphere soil, and to assess the lead phases accumulated in rhizosphere soil by sequential extraction. Without the hydroxyapatite, exchangeable lead fractions increased as the rhizosphere soil got closer to the contaminated soil. Exchangeable lead fractions were higher even in the rhizosphere soil that shares a boundary with the root surface than in the soil before being planted. Thus, plant growth of hairy vetch was lower in the soil without the hydroxyapatite than in the soil with the hydroxyapatite. The presence of hydroxyapatite may immobilize the majority of lead migrating from contaminated soil into the rhizosphere soil within 1 mm from the contaminated soil. The dominant lead fraction in the rhizosphere soil with the hydroxyapatite was residual. Thus, plant growth was not suppressed and the lead concentration of the plant shoot remained at the background level. These results indicate that the presence of hydroxyapatite in the rhizosphere soil at 5% wt may immobilize most of the lead migrating into the rhizosphere soil within 1 mm from the contaminated soil, resulting in the prevention of lead migration toward the root surface. View Full-Text
Keywords: hydroxyapatite; lead immobilization; mobility; rhizosphere; tolerance to lead toxicity hydroxyapatite; lead immobilization; mobility; rhizosphere; tolerance to lead toxicity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Katoh, M.; Risky, E.; Sato, T. Immobilization of Lead Migrating from Contaminated Soil in Rhizosphere Soil of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Using Hydroxyapatite. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph14101273

AMA Style

Katoh M, Risky E, Sato T. Immobilization of Lead Migrating from Contaminated Soil in Rhizosphere Soil of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Using Hydroxyapatite. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(10):1273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph14101273

Chicago/Turabian Style

Katoh, Masahiko, Elsya Risky, and Takeshi Sato. 2017. "Immobilization of Lead Migrating from Contaminated Soil in Rhizosphere Soil of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Hairy Vetch (Vicia villosa) Using Hydroxyapatite" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 10: 1273. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph14101273

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