Next Article in Journal
Impacts of Dynamic Agglomeration Externalities on Eco-Efficiency: Empirical Evidence from China
Next Article in Special Issue
Step Rate Thresholds Associated with Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity in Adults
Previous Article in Journal
Relationship between the Main Communities and Environments of an Urban River and Reservoir: Considering Integrated Structural and Functional Assessments of Ecosystems
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effect of a 12-Week Online Walking Intervention on Health and Quality of Life in Cancer Survivors: A Quasi-Randomized Controlled Trial
Article

The Effect of Detraining after a Period of Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Previously Sedentary Individuals

1
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide 5001, Australia
2
Recreation, Exercise & Sports Science Department, Western State Colorado University, Gunnison, CO 81231, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2303; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15102303
Received: 11 September 2018 / Revised: 4 October 2018 / Accepted: 16 October 2018 / Published: 19 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Collection Physical Activity and Public Health)
The purpose of this study was to quantify the time-magnitude changes in cardiometabolic health outcomes that occur with cessation of regular exercise training. All participants (n = 22) performed baseline testing, completed a 13-week exercise program, and completed post-program testing. Upon completion of the 13-week exercise program, participants were randomized to one of the following two treatment groups: (1) the treatment group that continued their exercise for 4 weeks (TRAIN); or (2) the treatment group that discontinued exercise (DETRAIN). Changes from baseline to 13 weeks in both the TRAIN and DETRAIN treatment groups for maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), body fat percentage, mean arterial pressure, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides were significantly favourable (p < 0.05). VO2max, body fat percentage, and favourable cardiometabolic health adaptations continued to improve (p < 0.05) with an additional one month of exercise training. Upon cessation of exercise, all measures of VO2max and body fat percentage, along with mean arterial pressure, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides significantly worsened (p < 0.05) in the DETRAIN treatment group. Favourable training adaptations were further enhanced with an additional month of continued exercise training, and cessation of regular exercise rapidly abolished all training adaptations within one month. These novel findings underscore the importance of sustained and uninterrupted exercise training. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical inactivity; metabolic syndrome; cardiorespiratory fitness; resistance training; aerobic training physical inactivity; metabolic syndrome; cardiorespiratory fitness; resistance training; aerobic training
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Nolan, P.B.; Keeling, S.M.; Robitaille, C.A.; Buchanan, C.A.; Dalleck, L.C. The Effect of Detraining after a Period of Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Previously Sedentary Individuals. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2303. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15102303

AMA Style

Nolan PB, Keeling SM, Robitaille CA, Buchanan CA, Dalleck LC. The Effect of Detraining after a Period of Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Previously Sedentary Individuals. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(10):2303. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15102303

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nolan, Paul B., Shawn M. Keeling, Chantelle A. Robitaille, Christina A. Buchanan, and Lance C. Dalleck 2018. "The Effect of Detraining after a Period of Training on Cardiometabolic Health in Previously Sedentary Individuals" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 10: 2303. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15102303

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop