Next Article in Journal
Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Health Care Workers. A Pre-Post Intervention Study in an Italian Paediatric Hospital
Next Article in Special Issue
Understanding of Information about Medicines Use among Parents of Pre-School Children in Serbia: Parental Pharmacotherapy Literacy Questionnaire (PTHL-SR)
Previous Article in Journal
Effect of Drought on Agronomic Traits of Rice and Wheat: A Meta-Analysis
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Antecedents and Consequences of Health Literacy in an Ecological Perspective: Results from an Experimental Analysis
Article

Do Low Income Youth of Color See “The Bigger Picture” When Discussing Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Public Health Literacy Campaign

Department of Medicine and Center for Vulnerable, Populations University of California San Francisco, Zuckerberg San Francisco Hospital, 1001 Potrero Avenue San Francisco, CA 94118, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 840; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050840
Received: 3 February 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Literacy in Context—Settings, Media, and Populations)
As Type 2 diabetes spikes among minority and low-income youth, there is an urgent need to tackle the drivers of this preventable disease. The Bigger Picture (TBP) is a counter-marketing campaign using youth-created, spoken-word public service announcements (PSAs) to reframe the epidemic as a socio-environmental phenomenon requiring communal action, civic engagement and norm change. Methods: We examined whether and how TBP PSAs advance health literacy among low-income, minority youth. We showed nine PSAs, asking individuals open-ended questions via questionnaire, then facilitating a focus group to reflect upon the PSAs. Results: Questionnaire responses revealed a balance between individual vs. public health literacy. Some focused on individual responsibility and behaviors, while others described socio-environmental forces underlying risk. The focus group generated a preponderance of public health literacy responses, emphasizing future action. Striking sociopolitical themes emerged, reflecting tensions minority and low-income youth experience, such as entrapment vs. liberation. Conclusion: Our findings speak to the structural barriers and complexities underlying diabetes risk, and the ability of spoken word medium to make these challenges visible and motivate action. Practice Implications: Delivering TBP content to promote interactive reflection has potential to change behavioral norms and build capacity to confront the social, economic and structural factors that influence behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: health literacy; social marketing; type 2 diabetes; diabetes prevention; qualitative research health literacy; social marketing; type 2 diabetes; diabetes prevention; qualitative research
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Schillinger, D.; Tran, J.; Fine, S. Do Low Income Youth of Color See “The Bigger Picture” When Discussing Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Public Health Literacy Campaign. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 840. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050840

AMA Style

Schillinger D, Tran J, Fine S. Do Low Income Youth of Color See “The Bigger Picture” When Discussing Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Public Health Literacy Campaign. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(5):840. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050840

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schillinger, Dean, Jessica Tran, and Sarah Fine. 2018. "Do Low Income Youth of Color See “The Bigger Picture” When Discussing Type 2 Diabetes: A Qualitative Evaluation of a Public Health Literacy Campaign" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 5: 840. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050840

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop