Next Article in Journal
Measurement of Pesticide Residues from Chemical Control of the Invasive Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in a Maize Experimental Field in Mokwa, Nigeria
Next Article in Special Issue
Expressed Emotion, Shame, and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury
Previous Article in Journal
Maternal Vaccination as an Essential Component of Life-Course Immunization and Its Contribution to Preventive Neonatology
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Impact of Caller Gender on Telephone Crisis-Helpline Workers’ Interpretation of Suicidality in Caller Vignettes
Open AccessArticle

Suicidal Ideation and Healthy Immigrant Effect in the Canadian Population: A Cross-Sectional Population Based Study

School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 848; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050848
Received: 9 March 2018 / Revised: 22 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 25 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Suicide Research)
Understanding suicidal ideation is crucial for preventing suicide. Although “healthy immigrant effect” is a phenomenon that has been well documented across a multitude of epidemiological and social studies—where immigrants are, on average, healthier than the native-born, little research has examined the presence of such effect on suicidal ideation. The objective of this study is to investigate if there is a differential effect of immigration identity on suicidal ideation and how the effect varies by socio-demographic characteristics in the Canadian population. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey in year 2014 were used. Multivariate logistic regression was employed. Our findings indicated that recent immigrants (lived in Canada for 9 or less years) were significantly less likely to report suicidal ideation compared with non-immigrants. However, for established immigrants (10 years and above of living in Canada), the risk of suicidal ideation converged to Canadian-born population. Moreover, male immigrants were at significantly lower risk of having suicidal ideation than Canadian-born counterparts; whereas, female immigrants did not benefit from the “healthy immigrant effect”. Our findings suggest the need for targeted intervention strategies on suicidal ideation among established immigrants and female immigrants. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicidal ideation; immigrant; healthy immigrant effect; gender differences suicidal ideation; immigrant; healthy immigrant effect; gender differences
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Elamoshy, R.; Feng, C. Suicidal Ideation and Healthy Immigrant Effect in the Canadian Population: A Cross-Sectional Population Based Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 848. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050848

AMA Style

Elamoshy R, Feng C. Suicidal Ideation and Healthy Immigrant Effect in the Canadian Population: A Cross-Sectional Population Based Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(5):848. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050848

Chicago/Turabian Style

Elamoshy, Rasha; Feng, Cindy. 2018. "Suicidal Ideation and Healthy Immigrant Effect in the Canadian Population: A Cross-Sectional Population Based Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 5: 848. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15050848

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop