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Article

Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013

by 1,2, 1,2,3, 1,4,5, 2,4 and 1,2,3,4,*
1
Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43215, USA
2
Center for Injury Research and Policy, The Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43215, USA
3
College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
5
Department of Neurosurgery, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, OH 43205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1171; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15061171
Received: 18 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
Objective: To use the 2006–2013 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) database to describe trends of age-adjusted rates of pediatric traumatic brain injuries (TBI) treated in U.S. emergency departments. Methods: Time trend analysis was conducted on age-adjusted rates among children ≤17 years in the U.S. The annual percent change (APC) was calculated by fitting a least squares regression to the logarithm of the rates, using the calendar year as an independent variable. Results: In males, motor-vehicle-related trauma (APC −2.5%) and severe TBI (APC −3.6%) decreased over the study time period. Conversely, concussion (APC 5.1%), unspecified head injury (APC 6.6%), fall-related TBI (APC 7.1%), and mild TBI (APC 5.9%) increased. In females, severe TBI (APC −3.3%) decreased over the study time period and concussion (APC 6.5%), unspecified head injury (APC 7.2%), fall-related TBI (APC 7.6%), and mild TBI (APC 6.8%) increased. Conclusion: The overall age-adjusted rates of pediatric TBI-related emergency department (ED) visits increased from 2006 to 2013, which is largely caused by pediatric mild TBIs, especially unspecified injury to the head (ICD-9-CM code 959.01) and concussion. In comparison, age-adjusted rates of pediatric severe TBIs decreased. A major contributing factor might be a reduced number of traffic-related head trauma. View Full-Text
Keywords: traumatic brain injury; pediatric; emergency department; annual percent change traumatic brain injury; pediatric; emergency department; annual percent change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, C.; Peng, J.; Sribnick, E.A.; Zhu, M.; Xiang, H. Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1171. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15061171

AMA Style

Chen C, Peng J, Sribnick EA, Zhu M, Xiang H. Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(6):1171. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15061171

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chen, Cheng; Peng, Jin; Sribnick, Eric A.; Zhu, Motao; Xiang, Henry. 2018. "Trend of Age-Adjusted Rates of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury in U.S. Emergency Departments from 2006 to 2013" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 6: 1171. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15061171

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