Next Article in Journal
A Stability Indicating HPLC Method to Determine Actual Content and Stability of Nicotine within Electronic Cigarette Liquids
Previous Article in Journal
Emergency and Mental Health Nurses’ Perceptions and Attitudes towards Alcoholics
Article

Grief and Avoidant Death Attitudes Combine to Predict the Fading Affect Bias

1
Department of Psychology, Christopher Newport University, 1 Avenue of the Arts, Newport News, VA 23606, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Old Dominion University, 5115 Hampton Blvd, Norfolk, VA 23529, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1736; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15081736
Received: 6 July 2018 / Revised: 31 July 2018 / Accepted: 6 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
The fading affect bias (FAB) occurs when unpleasant affect fades faster than pleasant affect. To detect mechanisms that influence the FAB in the context of death, we measured neuroticism, depression, anxiety, negative religious coping, death attitudes, and complicated grief as potential predictors of FAB for unpleasant/death and pleasant events at 2 points in time. The FAB was robust across older and newer events, which supported the mobilization-minimization hypothesis. Unexpectedly, complicated grief positively predicted FAB, and death avoidant attitudes moderated this relation, such that the Initial Event Affect by Grief interaction was only significant at the highest 3 quintiles of death avoidant attitudes. These results were likely due to moderate grief ratings, which were, along with avoidant death attitudes, related to healthy outcomes in past research. These results implicate complicated grief and death avoidant attitudes as resiliency mechanisms that are mobilized during bereavement to minimize its unpleasant effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: fading affect bias; complicated grief; death attitudes fading affect bias; complicated grief; death attitudes
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Gibbons, J.A.; Lee, S.A.; Fehr, A.M.A.; Wilson, K.J.; Marshall, T.R. Grief and Avoidant Death Attitudes Combine to Predict the Fading Affect Bias. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1736. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15081736

AMA Style

Gibbons JA, Lee SA, Fehr AMA, Wilson KJ, Marshall TR. Grief and Avoidant Death Attitudes Combine to Predict the Fading Affect Bias. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(8):1736. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15081736

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gibbons, Jeffrey A., Sherman A. Lee, Ashley M.A. Fehr, Kalli J. Wilson, and Timothy R. Marshall 2018. "Grief and Avoidant Death Attitudes Combine to Predict the Fading Affect Bias" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 8: 1736. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15081736

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop