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Open AccessArticle

Socio-Cultural Reasons and Community Perceptions Regarding Indoor Cooking Using Biomass Fuel and Traditional Stoves in Rural Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa P.O. Box 366 Code 1029, Ethiopia
2
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Medicinaregatan 16A, 41390 Gothenburg, Sweden
3
Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Guldhedsgatan 10A, SE 41346 Gothenburg, Sweden
4
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE 41390 Gothenburg, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2035; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15092035
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
Around three billion people in the world and 90% of the rural households in low-and middle-income countries are exposed to wood smoke with varying exposure levels and resulting health risks. We aimed to explore perceptions of the community towards indoor cooking and the socio-cultural barriers to bring change in Butajira, rural Ethiopia. We conducted a qualitative study involving ten separate focus group discussions with purposively selected members of the community and two key informant interviews with health extension workers. Content analysis was carried out using ATLAS.ti software. Participants reported the use of fuel wood and traditional three-stone cook stove to cook food. Economic status, lack of commitment, cultural views and concern along with safety and security issues were found to be barriers to change from traditional to cleaner methods of cooking. The community perceived wood smoke to have effects on their eyes and respiratory health, though they culturally viewed it as beneficial for postpartum mothers and newborns, avoiding bad smell and insects and in order to strengthen the fabric of their houses. Health education at community level is essential in order to bring about change in the cultural views and cooking behaviors focusing on opening windows and keeping young children away during cooking. View Full-Text
Keywords: household air pollution; socio-cultural barriers; community perception; Ethiopia household air pollution; socio-cultural barriers; community perception; Ethiopia
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamire, M.; Addissie, A.; Skovbjerg, S.; Andersson, R.; Lärstad, M. Socio-Cultural Reasons and Community Perceptions Regarding Indoor Cooking Using Biomass Fuel and Traditional Stoves in Rural Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2035. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15092035

AMA Style

Tamire M, Addissie A, Skovbjerg S, Andersson R, Lärstad M. Socio-Cultural Reasons and Community Perceptions Regarding Indoor Cooking Using Biomass Fuel and Traditional Stoves in Rural Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(9):2035. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15092035

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamire, Mulugeta; Addissie, Adamu; Skovbjerg, Susann; Andersson, Rune; Lärstad, Mona. 2018. "Socio-Cultural Reasons and Community Perceptions Regarding Indoor Cooking Using Biomass Fuel and Traditional Stoves in Rural Ethiopia: A Qualitative Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 9: 2035. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph15092035

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