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Article

The Perceived Impact of Suicide Bereavement on Specific Interpersonal Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Survey Data

1
UCL Division of Psychiatry, Maple House, 149 Tottenham Court Road, London W1T 7NF, UK
2
UCL Research Department of Primary Care & Population Health, Rowland Hill St, London NW3 2PF, UK
3
Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust, St Pancras Hospital, London NW1 0PE, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1801; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16101801
Received: 6 April 2019 / Revised: 8 May 2019 / Accepted: 18 May 2019 / Published: 21 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide: Prevention, Intervention and Postvention)
People bereaved by suicide have an increased risk of suicide and suicide attempt, yet report receiving less support than people bereaved by other sudden deaths. Reductions in support may contribute to suicide risk, yet their nature is unclear. We explored the impact of suicide bereavement on the interpersonal relationships of young adults in the UK using an online survey to collect qualitative data. We conducted thematic analysis of free-text responses from 499 adults to questions capturing the impact of bereavement on relationships with partners, close friends, close family, extended family, and other contacts. We identified four main themes describing the changes in relationships following the suicide: (1) Social discomfort over the death (stigma and taboo; painfulness for self or others to discuss; socially prescribed grief reactions); (2) social withdrawal (loss of social confidence; withdrawal as a coping mechanism); (3) shared bereavement experience creating closeness and avoidance; (4) attachments influenced by fear of further losses (overprotectiveness towards others; avoiding attachments as protective). These findings contribute to understanding deficits in support and pathways to suicidality after suicide bereavement. Such disrupted attachments add to the burden of grief and could be addressed by public education on how to support those bereaved by suicide. View Full-Text
Keywords: suicide bereavement; qualitative research; grief; bereavement; social support; interpersonal relationships; kinship suicide bereavement; qualitative research; grief; bereavement; social support; interpersonal relationships; kinship
MDPI and ACS Style

Azorina, V.; Morant, N.; Nesse, H.; Stevenson, F.; Osborn, D.; King, M.; Pitman, A. The Perceived Impact of Suicide Bereavement on Specific Interpersonal Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Survey Data. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1801. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16101801

AMA Style

Azorina V, Morant N, Nesse H, Stevenson F, Osborn D, King M, Pitman A. The Perceived Impact of Suicide Bereavement on Specific Interpersonal Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Survey Data. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(10):1801. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16101801

Chicago/Turabian Style

Azorina, Valeriya, Nicola Morant, Hedvig Nesse, Fiona Stevenson, David Osborn, Michael King, and Alexandra Pitman. 2019. "The Perceived Impact of Suicide Bereavement on Specific Interpersonal Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Survey Data" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 10: 1801. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16101801

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