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Biodegradation of Polyethylene by Enterobacter sp. D1 from the Guts of Wax Moth Galleria mellonella

1
College of Life Science and Technology, Harbin Normal University, No. 1 Shida Road., Limin Economic Development Zone, Harbin 150025, China
2
Biotechnology Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, No. 12 Zhongguancun South Street., Beijing 100081, China
3
College of Forestry, Shanxi Agricultural University, Taigu 030801, China
4
Institute of Soil Fertilizer and Agricultural Water Saving, Xinjiang Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Urumqi 830091, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 1941; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16111941
Received: 28 April 2019 / Revised: 21 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
Plastic polymers are widely used in agriculture, industry, and our daily life because of their convenient and economic properties. However, pollution caused by plastic polymers, especially polyethylene (PE), affects both animal and human health when they aggregate in the environment, as they are not easily degraded under natural conditions. In this study, Enterobacter sp. D1 was isolated from the guts of wax moth (Galleria mellonella). Microbial colonies formed around a PE film after 14 days of cultivation with D1. Roughness, depressions, and cracks were detected on the surface of the PE film by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed the presence of carbonyl functional groups and ether groups on the PE film that was treated with D1. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) also revealed that the contents of certain alcohols, esters, and acids were increased as a result of the D1 treatment, indicating that oxidation reaction occurred on the surface of the PE film treated with D1 bacteria. These observations confirmed that D1 bacteria has an ability to degrade PE. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental impact; Enterobacter sp.; plastic biodegradation; polyethylene; wax moth environmental impact; Enterobacter sp.; plastic biodegradation; polyethylene; wax moth
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ren, L.; Men, L.; Zhang, Z.; Guan, F.; Tian, J.; Wang, B.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, W. Biodegradation of Polyethylene by Enterobacter sp. D1 from the Guts of Wax Moth Galleria mellonella. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1941. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16111941

AMA Style

Ren L, Men L, Zhang Z, Guan F, Tian J, Wang B, Wang J, Zhang Y, Zhang W. Biodegradation of Polyethylene by Enterobacter sp. D1 from the Guts of Wax Moth Galleria mellonella. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(11):1941. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16111941

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ren, Liu, Lina Men, Zhiwei Zhang, Feifei Guan, Jian Tian, Bin Wang, Jihua Wang, Yuhong Zhang, and Wei Zhang. 2019. "Biodegradation of Polyethylene by Enterobacter sp. D1 from the Guts of Wax Moth Galleria mellonella" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 11: 1941. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16111941

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