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Article

Lung Cancer Mortality Trends in a Brazilian City with a Long History of Asbestos Consumption

1
Department Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo-SP 01246-904, Brazil
2
Division of Medicine, Fundação Jorge Duprat e Figueiredo (Fundacentro), São Paulo-SP 05409-002, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2548; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142548
Received: 30 May 2019 / Revised: 26 June 2019 / Accepted: 4 July 2019 / Published: 17 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Asbestos Exposure and Disease: An Update)
There are scarce epidemiological studies on lung cancer mortality in areas exposed to asbestos in developing countries. We compared the rates and trends in mortality from lung cancer between 1980 and 2016 in a municipality that made extensive use of asbestos, Osasco, with rates from a referent municipality with lower asbestos exposure and with the rates for the State of São Paulo. We retrieved death records for cases of lung cancer (ICD-9 C162) (ICD-10 C33 C34) from 1980 to 2016 in adults aged 60 years and older. The join point regression and age-period-cohort models were fitted to the data. Among men, there was an increasing trend in lung cancer mortality in Osasco of 0.7% (CI: 0.1; 1.3) in contrast to a mean annual decrease for Sorocaba of -1.5% (CI: −2.4; −0.6) and a stable average trend for São Paulo of -0.1 (IC: −0.3; 0.1). Similar increasing trends were seen in women. The age-period-cohort model showed an increase in the risk of death from 1996 in Osasco and a reduction for Sorocaba and São Paulo State during the same period. Our results point to a need for a special monitoring regarding lung cancer incidence and mortality in areas with higher asbestos exposure. View Full-Text
Keywords: asbestos; lung neoplasms; mortality asbestos; lung neoplasms; mortality
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MDPI and ACS Style

Fernandes, G.A.; Algranti, E.; Conceição, G.M.d.S.; Wünsch Filho, V.; Toporcov, T.N. Lung Cancer Mortality Trends in a Brazilian City with a Long History of Asbestos Consumption. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142548

AMA Style

Fernandes GA, Algranti E, Conceição GMdS, Wünsch Filho V, Toporcov TN. Lung Cancer Mortality Trends in a Brazilian City with a Long History of Asbestos Consumption. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(14):2548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142548

Chicago/Turabian Style

Fernandes, Gisele A., Eduardo Algranti, Gleice M.d.S. Conceição, Victor Wünsch Filho, and Tatiana N. Toporcov 2019. "Lung Cancer Mortality Trends in a Brazilian City with a Long History of Asbestos Consumption" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 14: 2548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16142548

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