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Article

Characterization of Indoor Air Quality on a College Campus: A Pilot Study

1
Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
2
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
3
Department of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2721; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152721
Received: 28 June 2019 / Revised: 19 July 2019 / Accepted: 26 July 2019 / Published: 30 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Indoor Air Quality and Health Outcomes in Energy-Efficient Buildings)
Recent construction trends on college campuses have demonstrated a shift to designing buildings with features focused on sustainability. However, few studies have investigated indoor air quality in institutions of higher education, particularly in sustainably designed buildings. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of building and occupancy on indoor air quality within and between higher education buildings. We measured particulate matter, formaldehyde, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxides in LEED certified, retrofitted, and conventional building types on a college campus. Three size fractions of particulate matter were measured in each building. We conducted multi-zonal, 48-h measurements when the buildings were occupied and unoccupied. Outdoor particulate matter was significantly higher (PM2.5 = 4.76, PM4 = 17.1, and PM100 = 21.6 µg/m3) than in classrooms (PM2.5 = 1.7, PM4 = 4.2, and PM100 = 6.7 µg/m3) and common areas (PM2.5 = 1.3, PM4 = 4.2, and PM100 = 4.8 µg/m3; all p < 0.001). Additionally, concentrations of carbon dioxide and particulate matter were significantly higher (p < 0.05) during occupied sampling. The results suggest that occupancy status and building zone are major predictors of indoor air quality in campus buildings, which can, in turn, increase the concentration of contaminants, potentially impacting occupant health and performance. More research is warranted to reveal building features and human behaviors contributing to indoor exposures. View Full-Text
Keywords: indoor air; sustainability; LEED; higher education; public health; particulate matter indoor air; sustainability; LEED; higher education; public health; particulate matter
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MDPI and ACS Style

Erlandson, G.; Magzamen, S.; Carter, E.; Sharp, J.L.; Reynolds, S.J.; Schaeffer, J.W. Characterization of Indoor Air Quality on a College Campus: A Pilot Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2721. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152721

AMA Style

Erlandson G, Magzamen S, Carter E, Sharp JL, Reynolds SJ, Schaeffer JW. Characterization of Indoor Air Quality on a College Campus: A Pilot Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(15):2721. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152721

Chicago/Turabian Style

Erlandson, Grant, Sheryl Magzamen, Ellison Carter, Julia L. Sharp, Stephen J. Reynolds, and Joshua W. Schaeffer 2019. "Characterization of Indoor Air Quality on a College Campus: A Pilot Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 15: 2721. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152721

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