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Article

Evaluation of a Violence-Prevention Programme with Jamaican Primary School Teachers: A Cluster Randomised Trial

1
School of Psychology, Bangor University, Bangor LL57 2AS, UK
2
Caribbean Institute for Health Research, University of the West Indies, Kingston 7, Jamaica
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2797; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152797
Received: 30 June 2019 / Revised: 1 August 2019 / Accepted: 3 August 2019 / Published: 6 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Child Victimisation)
This study investigated the effect of a school-based violence prevention programme implemented in Grade 1 classrooms in Jamaican primary schools. Fourteen primary schools were randomly assigned to receive training in classroom behaviour management (n = 7 schools, 27 teachers/classrooms) or to a control group (n = 7 schools, 28 teachers/classrooms). Four children from each class were randomly selected to participate in the evaluation (n = 220 children). Teachers were trained through a combination of workshop and in-class support sessions, and received a mean of 11.5 h of training (range = 3–20) over 8 months. The primary outcomes were observations of (1) teachers’ use of violence against children and (2) class-wide child aggression. Teachers in intervention schools used significantly less violence against children (effect size (ES) = −0.73); benefits to class-wide child aggression were not significant (ES = −0.20). Intervention teachers also provided a more emotionally supportive classroom environment (ES = 1.22). No benefits were found to class-wide prosocial behaviour, teacher wellbeing, or child mental health. The intervention benefited children’s early learning skills, especially oral language and self-regulation skills (ES = 0.25), although no benefits were found to achievement in maths calculation, reading and spelling. A relatively brief teacher-training programme reduced violence against children by teachers and increased the quality of the classroom environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: violence; teacher training; child behaviour; corporal punishment; low- and middle-income country; primary school violence; teacher training; child behaviour; corporal punishment; low- and middle-income country; primary school
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baker-Henningham, H.; Scott, Y.; Bowers, M.; Francis, T. Evaluation of a Violence-Prevention Programme with Jamaican Primary School Teachers: A Cluster Randomised Trial. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2797. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152797

AMA Style

Baker-Henningham H, Scott Y, Bowers M, Francis T. Evaluation of a Violence-Prevention Programme with Jamaican Primary School Teachers: A Cluster Randomised Trial. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(15):2797. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152797

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baker-Henningham, Helen, Yakeisha Scott, Marsha Bowers, and Taja Francis. 2019. "Evaluation of a Violence-Prevention Programme with Jamaican Primary School Teachers: A Cluster Randomised Trial" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 15: 2797. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16152797

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