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Article

Increased Employment for Segregated Roma May Improve Their Health: Outcomes of a Public–Private Partnership Project

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Department of Health Psychology, Medical Faculty, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, Trieda SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice, Slovakia
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Graduate School Kosice Institute for Society and Health, P.J. Safarik University in Kosice, Trieda SNP 1, 040 11 Kosice, Slovakia
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Olomouc University Society and Health Institute, Palacky University in Olomouc, Univerzitni 22, 771 11 Olomouc, Czech Republic
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Department of Community and Occupational Medicine, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2889; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162889
Received: 21 June 2019 / Revised: 4 August 2019 / Accepted: 7 August 2019 / Published: 13 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Roma Health Disadvantage)
Increasing employment opportunities for segregated Roma might prevent major economic losses and improve their health. Involvement of the private sector in Roma employment, on top of intensified governmental actions, is likely to be a key to sustainable improvement, but evidence on this is scarce. Our aim was to determine the potential outcomes of such a partnership regarding increased employability and the resulting improved well-being and health. We therefore investigated a Roma employment project called Equality of Opportunity, run since 2002 by a private company, U.S. Steel Kosice, in eastern Slovakia. We conducted a multi-perspective qualitative study to obtain the perspectives of key stakeholders on the outcomes of this project. We found that they expected the employability of segregated Roma to increase in particular via improvements in their work ethic and working habits, education, skills acquisition, self-confidence, courage and social inclusion. They further expected as the main health effects of increased employability an improvement in Roma well-being and health via a stable income, better housing, crime reduction, improved hygienic standards, access to prevention and improved mental resilience. Social policies regarding segregated Roma could thus be best directed at increasing employment and at these topics in particular to increase their effects on Roma health. View Full-Text
Keywords: deprivation; Roma health; health promotion; unemployment; employability deprivation; Roma health; health promotion; unemployment; employability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bosakova, L.; Madarasova Geckova, A.; van Dijk, J.P.; Reijneveld, S.A. Increased Employment for Segregated Roma May Improve Their Health: Outcomes of a Public–Private Partnership Project. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 2889. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162889

AMA Style

Bosakova L, Madarasova Geckova A, van Dijk JP, Reijneveld SA. Increased Employment for Segregated Roma May Improve Their Health: Outcomes of a Public–Private Partnership Project. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(16):2889. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162889

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bosakova, Lucia, Andrea Madarasova Geckova, Jitse P. van Dijk, and Sijmen A. Reijneveld. 2019. "Increased Employment for Segregated Roma May Improve Their Health: Outcomes of a Public–Private Partnership Project" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 16: 2889. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16162889

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