Next Article in Journal
The Relationship between Functional Health Literacy, Self-Rated Health, and Social Support between Younger and Older Adults in Ghana
Previous Article in Journal
Results of a Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial to Promote the Use of Respiratory Protective Equipment among Migrant Workers Exposed to Organic Solvents in Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises
Article

The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea

by 1,2, 1,2, 1,2 and 2,3,*
1
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
2
Institute of Health Services Research, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722, Korea
3
Department of Preventive Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 03722, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3186; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173186
Received: 11 July 2019 / Revised: 23 August 2019 / Accepted: 27 August 2019 / Published: 31 August 2019
Previous research suggests that adult men consume larger amounts of calories while eating-out than when eating meals prepared at home. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the association between the daily eating-out rate and body mass index (BMI) in the Korean population. The study used data from 18,019 individuals aged ≥19 years who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) from 2013 to 2016. BMI was measured according to the Asia-Pacific BMI measurement criteria. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine the validity of the association between the eating-out rate and BMI. In this population, women with higher eating-out rates were found to have higher BMIs. Specifically, the risks of becoming obese or overweight increased among those with a 1%–50% (obesity odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09–1.51; overweight OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.14–1.64) or 51%–100% daily eating-out rate (obesity OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 1.24–1.84; overweight OR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.20–1.87), relative to those who reported never eating-out. By contrast, no statistically significant association between the daily eating-out rate and BMI was observed among men. Notably, we observed positive associations of the daily eating-out rate with obesity and being overweight in South Korean women, but not men. Our findings suggest that education about proper habits when eating-out is needed to prevent obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: BMI; obesity; overweight; eating-out rate; Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey BMI; obesity; overweight; eating-out rate; Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.J.; Oh, S.Y.; Choi, D.-W.; Park, E.-C. The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3186. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173186

AMA Style

Kim HJ, Oh SY, Choi D-W, Park E-C. The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(17):3186. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173186

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Hwi J., So Y. Oh, Dong-Woo Choi, and Eun-Cheol Park. 2019. "The Association between Eating-Out Rate and BMI in Korea" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 17: 3186. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16173186

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop