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Review

What Is the Experience of Practitioners in Health, Education or Social Care Roles Following a Death by Suicide? A Qualitative Research Synthesis

1
School of Allied Health and Community, University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK
2
School of Psychology, University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester WR2 6AJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3293; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16183293
Received: 19 August 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 5 September 2019 / Published: 7 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suicide: Prevention, Intervention and Postvention)
Recent research has highlighted that the number of people impacted by a death by suicide is far greater than previously estimated and includes wider networks beyond close family members. It is important to understand the ways in which suicide impacts different groups within these wider networks so that safe and appropriate postvention support can be developed and delivered. A systematic review in the form of a qualitative research synthesis was undertaken with the aim of addressing the question ‘what are the features of the experiences of workers in health, education or social care roles following the death by suicide of a client, patient, student or service user?’ The analysis developed three categories of themes, ‘Horror, shock and trauma’, ‘Scrutiny, judgement and blame’, and ‘Support, learning and living with’. The mechanisms of absolution and incrimination were perceived to impact upon practitioners’ experiences within social and cultural contexts. Practitioners need to feel prepared for the potential impacts of a suicide and should be offered targeted postvention support to help them in processing their responses and in developing narratives that enable continued safe practice. Postvention responses need to be contextualised socially, culturally and organisationally so that they are sensitive to individual need. View Full-Text
Keywords: postvention; suicide; suicide loss; suicide bereavement; practitioner; systematic review; qualitative research synthesis postvention; suicide; suicide loss; suicide bereavement; practitioner; systematic review; qualitative research synthesis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Causer, H.; Muse, K.; Smith, J.; Bradley, E. What Is the Experience of Practitioners in Health, Education or Social Care Roles Following a Death by Suicide? A Qualitative Research Synthesis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16183293

AMA Style

Causer H, Muse K, Smith J, Bradley E. What Is the Experience of Practitioners in Health, Education or Social Care Roles Following a Death by Suicide? A Qualitative Research Synthesis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(18):3293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16183293

Chicago/Turabian Style

Causer, Hilary, Kate Muse, Jo Smith, and Eleanor Bradley. 2019. "What Is the Experience of Practitioners in Health, Education or Social Care Roles Following a Death by Suicide? A Qualitative Research Synthesis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 18: 3293. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16183293

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