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Article

Exploring the Experiences of West African Immigrants Living with Type 2 Diabetes in the UK

Department of Public Health and Human Sciences, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Bournemouth University, Bournemouth BH1 3LH, UK
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3516; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193516
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 9 September 2019 / Accepted: 10 September 2019 / Published: 20 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations)
The increasing prevalence and poorer management of Type 2 diabetes among West African immigrants in the UK is a public health concern. This research explored the experiences of West African immigrants in the management of Type 2 diabetes in the UK using a constructivist grounded theory approach. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with thirty-four West African immigrants living with Type 2 diabetes in the London area. Fifteen male and nineteen female adult West African immigrants with age range from 33–82 years participated in the study. Participants were recruited from five diabetes support groups and community settings. Initial, focused and theoretical coding, constant comparison and memos were used to analyse collected data. Three concepts emerged: Changing dietary habits composed of participants’ experiences in meeting dietary recommendations, improving physical activity concerned with the experience of reduced physical activity since moving to the UK and striving to adapt which focus on the impact of migration changes in living with Type 2 diabetes in the UK. These address challenges that West African immigrants experience in the management of Type 2 diabetes in the UK. The findings of this research provide a better understanding of the influencing factors and can be used to improve the support provided for West Africans living with Type 2 diabetes in the UK, presenting a deeper understanding of socio-cultural factors that contribute to supporting individuals from this population. View Full-Text
Keywords: diabetes management; immigrants; dietary habits diabetes management; immigrants; dietary habits
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MDPI and ACS Style

Alloh, F.; Hemingway, A.; Turner-Wilson, A. Exploring the Experiences of West African Immigrants Living with Type 2 Diabetes in the UK. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3516. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193516

AMA Style

Alloh F, Hemingway A, Turner-Wilson A. Exploring the Experiences of West African Immigrants Living with Type 2 Diabetes in the UK. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(19):3516. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193516

Chicago/Turabian Style

Alloh, Folashade, Ann Hemingway, and Angela Turner-Wilson. 2019. "Exploring the Experiences of West African Immigrants Living with Type 2 Diabetes in the UK" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 19: 3516. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16193516

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