Next Article in Journal
Clostridium perfringens Foodborne Outbreak during an Athletic Event in Northern Greece, June 2019
Next Article in Special Issue
Utilising Digital Health Technology to Support Patient-Healthcare Provider Communication in Fragility Fracture Recovery: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Previous Article in Journal
Using Mosses as Bioindicators of Potentially Toxic Element Contamination in Ecologically Valuable Areas Located in the Vicinity of a Road: A Case Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Traditional vs. iPad-Enhanced Aerobic Exercise on Wayfinding Efficacy and Cognition: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial
Brief Report

A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Acceptability of Using a Smart Pillbox to Enhance Medication Adherence Among Primary Care Patients

School of Nursing, LKS Faculty of Medicine, 4/F, William M.W. Mong Block, 21 Sassoon Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3964; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16203964
Received: 10 September 2019 / Revised: 30 September 2019 / Accepted: 14 October 2019 / Published: 17 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Health Interventions in Everyday Settings)
Smart pillboxes that remind patients to take medication may help avoid unintended non-adherence to medication regimens. To better understand the implementation potential of smart pillboxes among patients with chronic diseases, this study aimed to explore patients’ acceptability to use such devices and its associated factors. Five-hundred primary care patients aged 40 years or older were randomly recruited from a government-funded primary care clinic in Hong Kong. Patients were asked (i) if they needed to take medication daily, (ii) how many daily oral medications they needed to take on average, (iii) if they had ever missed a dose by accident, and (iv) if they were willing to use a smart pillbox for free to remind them to take medication. Out of the 344 participants included in the analysis who needed to take daily oral medication, 49.1% reported having previously missed a dose by accident, and 70.6% were willing to use a smart pillbox for free. A multiple logistic regression model found that male patients (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 0.59) and patients with hypertension (aOR: 0.56) were less likely to have previously missed a dose by accident. Patients who needed to take a greater number of daily medications (aOR: 1.16), who had previously missed a dose by accident (aOR: 2.44), with heart disease (aOR: 3.67) and with a high monthly income (aOR: 2.30) were more willing to use a smart pillbox, while older patients (aOR: 0.95) were less willing to do so. Primary care patients who reported missing a dose by accident were 2.4 times as likely to want to use a smart pillbox while those with heart disease were almost 4 times as likely to want to use a smart pillbox. Further studies such as those evaluating the willingness to pay for smart pillboxes and randomised control trials to evaluate the effectiveness of smart pillboxes in enhancing medication adherence should be conducted to provide more evidence about the implementation potential of such devices. View Full-Text
Keywords: patient acceptance of health care; medication adherence; primary health care patient acceptance of health care; medication adherence; primary health care
MDPI and ACS Style

Choi, E.P.H. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Acceptability of Using a Smart Pillbox to Enhance Medication Adherence Among Primary Care Patients. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3964. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16203964

AMA Style

Choi EPH. A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Acceptability of Using a Smart Pillbox to Enhance Medication Adherence Among Primary Care Patients. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(20):3964. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16203964

Chicago/Turabian Style

Choi, Edmond P.H. 2019. "A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Acceptability of Using a Smart Pillbox to Enhance Medication Adherence Among Primary Care Patients" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 20: 3964. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16203964

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop