Next Article in Journal
Bridging the Gap between Affective Well-Being and Organizational Citizenship Behavior: The Role of Work Engagement and Collectivist Orientation
Previous Article in Journal
Screening of Forestry Workers in Guadalajara Province (Spain) for Antibodies to Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus, Hantavirus, Rickettsia spp. and Borrelia burgdorferi
Article

Fatigue-Related Factors for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Diabetes: A Theory-Guided Multi-Dimensional Approach Using the Dynamic Biopsychosocial Model

Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4502; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16224502
Received: 2 October 2019 / Revised: 11 November 2019 / Accepted: 13 November 2019 / Published: 15 November 2019
Older adults with diabetes appear more susceptible to fatigue compared to younger adults with diabetes or healthy older adults, since aging and diabetes independently and synergistically influence fatigue. Few studies have investigated fatigue in older adults with diabetes using a multidimensional approach. This study explored the influences of physical, psychological, interpersonal, and contextual factors on diabetes fatigue using a dynamic biopsychosocial model. Face-to-face surveys were administered to community-dwelling older adults with diabetes and included variables across four domains (i.e., physical, psychological, interpersonal, and contextual factors). Univariate analyses and multiple linear regression were used. The mean fatigue score was 3.94 (standard deviation (SD) = 1.81) out of 7, and the prevalence of fatigue was 48.8%. Significant differences in fatigue severity by psychological, interpersonal, and contextual factors were found. Comorbidity and psychological factors were significant predictors of fatigue in the model, explaining 31.9% of the variance. As nearly half the sample experienced moderate or severe fatigue, which was significantly influenced by both comorbidity and psychological factors, including depression, sleep quality, and diet-related psychological characteristics, assessing patients’ psychological status may be important. Awareness of fatigue could be incorporated into dietary interventions for older adults with diabetes. View Full-Text
Keywords: fatigue; older adults with diabetes; dynamic biopsychosocial model fatigue; older adults with diabetes; dynamic biopsychosocial model
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, H.; Son, H. Fatigue-Related Factors for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Diabetes: A Theory-Guided Multi-Dimensional Approach Using the Dynamic Biopsychosocial Model. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4502. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16224502

AMA Style

Kim H, Son H. Fatigue-Related Factors for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Diabetes: A Theory-Guided Multi-Dimensional Approach Using the Dynamic Biopsychosocial Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(22):4502. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16224502

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Hyerang, and Heesook Son. 2019. "Fatigue-Related Factors for Community-Dwelling Older Adults with Diabetes: A Theory-Guided Multi-Dimensional Approach Using the Dynamic Biopsychosocial Model" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 22: 4502. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph16224502

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop