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Review

Mind–Body Exercise for Anxiety and Depression in COPD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

by 1, 2, 3,* and 4
1
School of Wushu, Chengdu Sport University, Chengdu 610041, China
2
School of Physical Education and Sport Training, Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai 200438, China
3
Department of Physical Education, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070, China
4
The Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge CB1 1PT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 22; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010022
Received: 15 November 2019 / Revised: 14 December 2019 / Accepted: 16 December 2019 / Published: 18 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mindfulness-Based Practice for Health Benefits)
Objectives: Mind–body exercise has been generally recognized as a beneficial strategy to improve mental health in those with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). However, to date, no attempt has been made to collate this literature. The aim of the present study was to systematically analyze the effects of mind–body exercise for COPD patients with anxiety and depression and provide scientific evidence-based exercise prescription. Methods: both Chinese and English databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, Baidu Scholar) were used as sources of data to search randomized controlled trials (RCT) relating to mind–body exercise in COPD patients with anxiety and depression that were published between January 1982 to June 2019. 13 eligible RCT studies were finally used for meta-analysis. Results: Mind–body exercise (tai chi, health qigong, yoga) had significant benefits on COPD patients with anxiety (SMD = −0.76, 95% CI −0.91 to −0.60, p = 0.04, I2 = 47.4%) and depression (SMD = −0.86, 95% CI −1.14 to −0.58, p = 0.000, I2 = 71.4%). Sub-group analysis indicated that, for anxiety, 30–60 min exercise session for 24 weeks of health qigong or yoga had a significant effect on patients with COPD who are more than 70 years and have more than a 10-year disease course. For depression, 2–3 times a week, 30–60 min each time of health qigong had a significant effect on patients with COPD patients who are more than 70 years old and have less than a 10-year disease course. Conclusions: Mind–body exercise could reduce levels of anxiety and depression in those with COPD. More robust RCT are required on this topic. View Full-Text
Keywords: mind–body exercise; COPD; anxiety; depression mind–body exercise; COPD; anxiety; depression
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, Z.; Liu, S.; Wang, L.; Smith, L. Mind–Body Exercise for Anxiety and Depression in COPD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 22. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010022

AMA Style

Li Z, Liu S, Wang L, Smith L. Mind–Body Exercise for Anxiety and Depression in COPD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):22. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010022

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Zaimin, Shijie Liu, Lin Wang, and Lee Smith. 2020. "Mind–Body Exercise for Anxiety and Depression in COPD Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 1: 22. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010022

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