Next Article in Journal
Lifestyle Habits Predict Academic Performance in High School Students: The Adolescent Student Academic Performance Longitudinal Study (ASAP)
Next Article in Special Issue
Cultural Differences in Tweeting about Drinking Across the US
Previous Article in Journal
Psychological Profile, Competitive Anxiety, Moods and Self-Efficacy in Beach Handball Players
Previous Article in Special Issue
How Health Communication via Tik Tok Makes a Difference: A Content Analysis of Tik Tok Accounts Run by Chinese Provincial Health Committees
Article

The Perceived Availability of Online Social Support: Exploring the Contributions of Illness and Rural Identities in Adults with Chronic Respiratory Illness

1
STEM Translational Communication Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
2
Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
3
Department of Health Education and Promotion, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 242; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010242
Received: 11 December 2019 / Revised: 26 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 29 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exploring the Role of Social Media in Health Promotion)
Joining an online social support group may increase perceived membership to a community, but it does not guarantee that the community will be available when it is needed. This is especially relevant for adults with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), many of whom reside in rural regions and continually negotiate their illness identity. Drawing from social support literature and communication theory of identity, this cross-sectional study explored how COPD illness and geographic identities interact to influence patients’ perceived availability of online social support. In April 2018, 575 adults with a history of respiratory symptoms completed an online survey. Patients with a COPD diagnosis reported greater availability of online support. This was partially mediated by a positive degree of COPD illness identity (i.e., being diagnosed with COPD, a history of tobacco use, severe respiratory symptoms, high disease knowledge, and low income but high education). The relationship between COPD illness identity and the availability of online support was strongest among those with low rural identity; however, at lower levels of COPD illness identity, participants with high rural identity reported the greatest degree of available online support. Results have important implications for tailored education approaches across the COPD care continuum by illness and geographic identities. View Full-Text
Keywords: online social support; social identity; communication theory of identity; rural health; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease online social support; social identity; communication theory of identity; rural health; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Paige, S.R.; Damiani, R.E.; Flood-Grady, E.; Krieger, J.L.; Stellefson, M. The Perceived Availability of Online Social Support: Exploring the Contributions of Illness and Rural Identities in Adults with Chronic Respiratory Illness. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 242. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010242

AMA Style

Paige SR, Damiani RE, Flood-Grady E, Krieger JL, Stellefson M. The Perceived Availability of Online Social Support: Exploring the Contributions of Illness and Rural Identities in Adults with Chronic Respiratory Illness. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(1):242. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010242

Chicago/Turabian Style

Paige, Samantha R., Rachel E. Damiani, Elizabeth Flood-Grady, Janice L. Krieger, and Michael Stellefson. 2020. "The Perceived Availability of Online Social Support: Exploring the Contributions of Illness and Rural Identities in Adults with Chronic Respiratory Illness" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 1: 242. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17010242

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop