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Article

Examining Shopping Patterns, Use of Food-Related Resources, and Proposed Solutions to Improve Healthy Food Access Among Food Insecure and Food Secure Eastern North Carolina Residents

1
Health Education, Albemarle Regional Health Services, Elizabeth City, NC 27909, USA
2
Department of Public Health, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA
3
Health Education and Promotion, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27834, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3361; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103361
Received: 20 April 2020 / Revised: 3 May 2020 / Accepted: 4 May 2020 / Published: 12 May 2020
In the Southern United States (U.S.), food insecurity rates are higher in rural (20.8%) versus urban communities (15%). Food insecurity can exacerbate diet-related disease. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine differences in the use of food-related community resources and potential solutions proposed among food insecure versus food secure residents. A community survey (n = 370) was conducted in rural eastern North Carolina, with questions pertaining to food security status and food-related resources. The IBM SPSS Statistics software and SAS software were used to examine differences in food-related resources, and qualitative data analysis was used to examine differences in solutions offered between food insecure and food secure participants. Of the 370 respondents, forty-eight-point-six percent were classified as food insecure. Food insecure participants were more likely to report shopping for groceries at a convenience/discount store, less likely to use their own vehicle for transportation, and less likely to purchase food from local producers. Food insecure participants were more likely to suggest solutions related to reducing the cost of healthy food, while food secure participants were more likely to suggest educational or convenience-related interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: food insecurity; food access; rural food insecurity; food access; rural
MDPI and ACS Style

Lyonnais, M.J.; Rafferty, A.P.; Jilcott Pitts, S.; Blanchard, R.J.; Kaur, A.P. Examining Shopping Patterns, Use of Food-Related Resources, and Proposed Solutions to Improve Healthy Food Access Among Food Insecure and Food Secure Eastern North Carolina Residents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3361. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103361

AMA Style

Lyonnais MJ, Rafferty AP, Jilcott Pitts S, Blanchard RJ, Kaur AP. Examining Shopping Patterns, Use of Food-Related Resources, and Proposed Solutions to Improve Healthy Food Access Among Food Insecure and Food Secure Eastern North Carolina Residents. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3361. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103361

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lyonnais, Mary J., Ann P. Rafferty, Stephanie Jilcott Pitts, Rebecca J. Blanchard, and Archana P. Kaur 2020. "Examining Shopping Patterns, Use of Food-Related Resources, and Proposed Solutions to Improve Healthy Food Access Among Food Insecure and Food Secure Eastern North Carolina Residents" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3361. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103361

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