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Article

Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Using Three-Item Recall Test and Its Associations with Fall-Related Outcomes: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study

by 1, 2,* and 3,*
1
Department of Biomedical Science and Technology, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
2
Department of Biomedical Science and Technology, College of Medicine, East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
3
Elderly Frailty Research Center, Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 02447, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3364; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103364
Received: 19 April 2020 / Revised: 9 May 2020 / Accepted: 11 May 2020 / Published: 12 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Management of Frailty)
Motoric cognitive risk (MCR) syndrome is originally defined as the presence of subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) and slow gait (SG). MCR is well known to be useful for predicting adverse health outcomes, including falls and dementia. However, around four out of five older Korean adults reported SCCs, thereby, it may not be discriminative to define MCR in Korea. We adopted the three-item recall (3IR) test, instead of SCCs, to define MCR. This cross-sectional analysis included 2133 community-dwelling older adults aged 70–84 years, without dementia or any dependence in activities of daily living from the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. The newly attempted criteria of MCR using 3IR were met by 105 participants (4.9%). MCR using 3IR showed synergistic effects on fall-related outcomes, whereas the conventional definition of MCR using SCCs was not superior to SG only. MCR using 3IR was associated with falls (odds ratio [OR]: 1.92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16–3.16), recurrent falls (OR: 2.19; 95% CI: 1.12–4.32), falls with injury (OR: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.22–3.22), falls with fracture (OR: 2.51; 95% CI: 1.09–5.79), fear of falling (OR: 3.00; 95% CI: 1.83–4.92), and low activities-specific balance confidence (OR: 3.13; 95% CI: 1.57–6.25). We found that MCR using 3IR could be useful in predicting fall-related outcomes in a cultural background reporting more SCCs, such as Korea. View Full-Text
Keywords: motoric cognitive risk syndrome; fall; gait speed; cognitive function; three-item recall; older adults motoric cognitive risk syndrome; fall; gait speed; cognitive function; three-item recall; older adults
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shim, H.; Kim, M.; Won, C.W. Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Using Three-Item Recall Test and Its Associations with Fall-Related Outcomes: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3364. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103364

AMA Style

Shim H, Kim M, Won CW. Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Using Three-Item Recall Test and Its Associations with Fall-Related Outcomes: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3364. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103364

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shim, Hayoung, Miji Kim, and Chang W. Won 2020. "Motoric Cognitive Risk Syndrome Using Three-Item Recall Test and Its Associations with Fall-Related Outcomes: The Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3364. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103364

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