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Article

Physical and Psychological Factors Associated with Poor Self-Reported Health Status in Older Adults with Falls

by 1,†, 1,2,† and 3,*
1
College of Nursing, Korea University, Anam-dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
Department of Nursing Science, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, 24 Beomil-ro 579beon-gil, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do 25601, Korea
3
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, 38 Bangdong-gil, Sacheon-myeon, Gangneung-si, Gangwon-do 25440, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors equally contributed on this work.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3548; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103548
Received: 21 March 2020 / Revised: 4 May 2020 / Accepted: 18 May 2020 / Published: 19 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Big Data, Decision Models, and Public Health)
Background: Previous studies have proposed various physical tests for screening fall risk in older adults. However, older adults may have physical or cognitive impairments that make testing difficult. This study describes the differences in individual, physical, and psychological factors between adults in good and poor self-rated health statuses. Further, we identified the physical or psychological factors associated with self-rated health by controlling for individual variables. Methods: Data from a total of 1577 adults aged 65 years or over with a history of falls were analyzed, using the 2017 National Survey of Older Persons in South Korea. Self-reported health status was dichotomized as good versus poor using the 5-point Likert question: “poor” (very poor and poor) and “good” (fair, good, and very good). Results: Visual/hearing impairments, ADL/IADL restriction, poor nutrition, and depression were more frequently observed in the group with poor self-rated health. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that poor self-reported health was significantly associated with hearing impairments (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.12–2.03), ADL limitation (OR: 1.77, 95% CI 1.11–2.81), IADL limitation (OR: 2.27, 95% CI 1.68–3.06), poor nutrition (OR: 1.36, 95% CI 1.05–1.77), and depression (OR 3.77, 95% CI 2.81–5.06). Conclusions: Auditory impairment, ADL/IADL limitations, poor nutrition, and depression were significantly associated with poor self-reported health. A self-rated health assessment could be an alternative tool for older adults who are not able to perform physical tests. View Full-Text
Keywords: fall; self-reported health status; older adults; public health fall; self-reported health status; older adults; public health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, J.; Byun, M.; Kim, M. Physical and Psychological Factors Associated with Poor Self-Reported Health Status in Older Adults with Falls. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103548

AMA Style

Kim J, Byun M, Kim M. Physical and Psychological Factors Associated with Poor Self-Reported Health Status in Older Adults with Falls. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103548

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Jiyeon, Mikyong Byun, and Moonho Kim. 2020. "Physical and Psychological Factors Associated with Poor Self-Reported Health Status in Older Adults with Falls" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3548. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103548

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