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Article

Factors Associated with Burnout Syndrome in Primary and Secondary School Teachers in the Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
2
Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of the Republic of Srpska-Center Bijeljina, 763000 Bijeljina, Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina
3
School of Public Health and Health Management and Institute of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
4
Institute of Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
5
Serbian Institute of Occupational Health, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3595; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103595
Received: 24 April 2020 / Revised: 15 May 2020 / Accepted: 15 May 2020 / Published: 20 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
Objectives: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of burnout syndrome in a large sample of primary and secondary school teachers in the Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina) and identify the factors associated with burnout in this population. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in August and September of 2018, on a sample of 952 teachers. Beside socio-demographic information, Bortner scale, Job Content Questionnaire, and Maslach Burnout Inventory were filled in by the study participants. Results: Only 5.1% of teachers reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, 3.8% reported high levels of depersonalization, and 22.3% reported low levels of personal accomplishment. Behavior type, specifically type-A behavior, was associated with higher levels of emotional exhaustion. The most important factors associated with burnout were work–life characteristics and job-demand-control model of occupational stress. Conclusions: Our study shows a low prevalence of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization in teachers in the Republic of Srpska before the beginning of the new school year. Since similar studies show a high prevalence of burnout at the end of the school year, a potential seasonality of this syndrome should be considered and explored further. View Full-Text
Keywords: occupational stress; education personnel; behavior type; work-life balance occupational stress; education personnel; behavior type; work-life balance
MDPI and ACS Style

Marić, N.; Mandić-Rajčević, S.; Maksimović, N.; Bulat, P. Factors Associated with Burnout Syndrome in Primary and Secondary School Teachers in the Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3595. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103595

AMA Style

Marić N, Mandić-Rajčević S, Maksimović N, Bulat P. Factors Associated with Burnout Syndrome in Primary and Secondary School Teachers in the Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina). International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3595. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103595

Chicago/Turabian Style

Marić, Nada, Stefan Mandić-Rajčević, Nataša Maksimović, and Petar Bulat. 2020. "Factors Associated with Burnout Syndrome in Primary and Secondary School Teachers in the Republic of Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina)" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3595. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103595

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