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Review

Depression and Objectively Measured Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

1
School of Medicine, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 20132 Milan, Italy
2
Accademia Lombarda di Sanità Pubblica, Consorzio Pavese Studi Post-Universitari, Unit of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Sciences, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
3
CAPHRI Care and Public Health Research Institute, Maastricht University, 6211 Maastricht, The Netherlands
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Unit of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Sciences, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
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Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health (DINOGMI), Section of Psychiatry, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
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IRCCS Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, 16132 Genoa, Italy
7
Mood Disorders Program, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3738; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103738
Received: 2 May 2020 / Revised: 13 May 2020 / Accepted: 15 May 2020 / Published: 25 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Lifestyle and Risk of Depression)
Depression is a major contributor to the overall global burden of disease, with high prevalence and relapse rate. Several factors have been considered in order to reduce the depression burden. Among them, physical activity (PA) showed a potential protective role. However, evidence is contrasting probably because of the differences in PA measurement. The aim of this systematic review with meta-analysis is to assess the association between objectively measured PA and incident and prevalent depression. The systematic review was conducted according to methods recommended by the Cochrane Collaboration and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant papers published through 31 August 2019 were identified searching through the electronic databases PubMed/MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (Embase), PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science (WoS), and the Cochrane Library. All analyses were conducted using ProMeta3. Finally, 42 studies met inclusion criteria. The overall Effect size (ES) of depression for the highest vs. the lowest level of PA was −1.16 [(95% CI = −1.41; −0.91), p-value < 0.001] based on 37,408 participants. The results of the meta-analysis showed a potential protective effect of PA on prevalent and incident depression. View Full-Text
Keywords: depressive symptoms; depression; physical activity; accelerometer; objectively measure; meta-analysis depressive symptoms; depression; physical activity; accelerometer; objectively measure; meta-analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gianfredi, V.; Blandi, L.; Cacitti, S.; Minelli, M.; Signorelli, C.; Amerio, A.; Odone, A. Depression and Objectively Measured Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3738. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103738

AMA Style

Gianfredi V, Blandi L, Cacitti S, Minelli M, Signorelli C, Amerio A, Odone A. Depression and Objectively Measured Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(10):3738. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103738

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gianfredi, Vincenza, Lorenzo Blandi, Stefano Cacitti, Mirko Minelli, Carlo Signorelli, Andrea Amerio, and Anna Odone. 2020. "Depression and Objectively Measured Physical Activity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 10: 3738. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17103738

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