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Article

Noncommunicable Diseases, Park Prescriptions, and Urban Green Space Use Patterns in a Global South Context: The Case of Dhaka, Bangladesh

1
School of Environment, Education and Development, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9 PL, UK
2
School of Health and Society, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
3
Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29631, USA
4
Department of City and Metropolitan Planning, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(11), 3900; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113900
Received: 18 April 2020 / Revised: 14 May 2020 / Accepted: 25 May 2020 / Published: 31 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Environment and Health)
Urban green space use is often associated with improved physical and mental health and lower noncommunicable disease (NCDs) burdens. Factors that influence green space visits have been documented in cities of the Global North, but evidence of urban green space use patterns for cities in the Global South is scarce. The aim of this study is to investigate factors influencing urban green space use patterns in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a megacity of the Global South, with a particular focus on how poor health condition and healthcare professionals’ prescriptions to exercise outdoors (park prescriptions—ParkRx) impact the green space use of middle-aged adults. We collected green space characteristics and use factors (i.e., availability, accessibility, attractiveness, and attachment), health condition, ParkRx, and urban green space use intensity (i.e., frequency and duration) via a self-reported questionnaire from 169 middle-aged residents of Dhaka. We used multivariate modeling to estimate the association of green space characteristics, health condition, and ParkRx with use intensity. We further applied a mediation analysis to determine the influence of ParkRx on the relationship between residents’ poor health conditions and use intensity. We found that green space availability and accessibility did not significantly influence use intensity, but attractiveness was negatively associated with use intensity. Green space use intensity was significantly and positively associated with attachment to the green space, poor health condition (i.e., having noncommunicable diseases), and ParkRx. ParkRx significantly mediated the relationship between health condition and use intensity. We observed limited supply, poor access, and low attractiveness when studying the urban green spaces in Dhaka, but these qualities did not affect use intensity, as found in many case studies in the Global North. In contrast, urban green space use intensity in our case study is mostly dependent on poor health condition and park prescriptions. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban green space; urban parks; park prescriptions; nature prescriptions; noncommunicable diseases; urban health; health promotion; Global South; developing countries urban green space; urban parks; park prescriptions; nature prescriptions; noncommunicable diseases; urban health; health promotion; Global South; developing countries
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MDPI and ACS Style

Labib, S.M.; Shuvo, F.K.; H. E. M. Browning, M.; Rigolon, A. Noncommunicable Diseases, Park Prescriptions, and Urban Green Space Use Patterns in a Global South Context: The Case of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 3900. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113900

AMA Style

Labib SM, Shuvo FK, H. E. M. Browning M, Rigolon A. Noncommunicable Diseases, Park Prescriptions, and Urban Green Space Use Patterns in a Global South Context: The Case of Dhaka, Bangladesh. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(11):3900. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113900

Chicago/Turabian Style

Labib, S.M., Faysal K. Shuvo, Matthew H. E. M. Browning, and Alessandro Rigolon. 2020. "Noncommunicable Diseases, Park Prescriptions, and Urban Green Space Use Patterns in a Global South Context: The Case of Dhaka, Bangladesh" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 11: 3900. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17113900

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