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Article

Evaluation of Sleep Quality in a Disaster Evacuee Environment

1
Graduate School of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima 739-8521, Japan
2
Department of Somnology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo 160-0023, Japan
3
Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 565-8531, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4252; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124252
Received: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 11 June 2020 / Published: 15 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disasters and Their Consequences for Public Health)
We aimed to evaluate sleep and sleep-related physiological parameters (heart rate variability and glucose dynamics) among evacuees by experimentally recreating the sleep environment of evacuation shelters and cars. Nine healthy young male subjects participated in this study. Two interventions, modeling the sleep environments of evacuation shelters (evacuation shelter trial) and car seats (car trial), were compared with sleep at home (control trial). Physiological data were measured using portable two-channel electroencephalogram and electrooculogram monitoring systems, wearable heart rate sensors, and flash glucose monitors. Wake after sleep onset (WASO) and stage shift were greater in both intervention trials than the control trial, while rapid-eye movement (REM) latency and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) 1 were longer and REM duration was shorter in the evacuation shelter trial than the control trial. Glucose dynamics and power at low frequency (LF.p) of heart rate variability were higher in the car trial than in the control trial. It was confirmed that sleep environment was important to maintain sleep, and affected glucose dynamics and heart rate variability in the experimental situation. View Full-Text
Keywords: evacuation shelter; car; sleep; heart rate variability; glucose dynamics evacuation shelter; car; sleep; heart rate variability; glucose dynamics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ogata, H.; Kayaba, M.; Kaneko, M.; Ogawa, K.; Kiyono, K. Evaluation of Sleep Quality in a Disaster Evacuee Environment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 4252. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124252

AMA Style

Ogata H, Kayaba M, Kaneko M, Ogawa K, Kiyono K. Evaluation of Sleep Quality in a Disaster Evacuee Environment. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(12):4252. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124252

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ogata, Hitomi, Momoko Kayaba, Miki Kaneko, Keiko Ogawa, and Ken Kiyono. 2020. "Evaluation of Sleep Quality in a Disaster Evacuee Environment" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 12: 4252. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17124252

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