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Article

Dietary Diversity Score: Implications for Obesity Prevention and Nutrient Adequacy in Renal Transplant Recipients

1
Department of Medical Nutrition Therapy, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou 33305, Taiwan
2
School of Nutrition and Health Sciences, College of Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan
3
Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou 33305, Taiwan
4
Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 11114, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5083; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145083
Received: 6 June 2020 / Revised: 28 June 2020 / Accepted: 8 July 2020 / Published: 14 July 2020
Obesity affects both medical and surgical outcomes in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Dietary diversity, an important component of a healthy diet, might be a useful nutritional strategy for monitoring patients with obesity. In this cross-sectional study, the data of 85 eligible RTRs were analyzed. Demographic data, routine laboratory data, and 3-day dietary data were collected. Participants were grouped into nonobesity and obesity groups based on body mass index (BMI) (for Asian adults, the cutoff point is 27 kg/m2). Dietary diversity score (DDS) was computed by estimating scores for the six food groups emphasized in the Food Guide. The mean age and BMI of participants were 49.7 ± 12.6 years and 24.0 ± 3.8 kg/m2, respectively. In the study population, 20.0% (n = 17) were obese. DDS was significantly lower in obese participants than in those who were not obese (1.53 ± 0.87 vs. 2.13 ± 0.98; p = 0.029). In addition, DDS was correlated with nutrition adequacy of the diet. Multivariate analysis showed that the odds of obesity decreased with each unit increase in DDS (odds ratio, 0.278; 95% confidence interval, 0.101–0.766; p = 0.013). We conclude that patients with higher dietary diversity have a lower prevalence of obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: renal transplant recipients; obesity; dietary diversity; nutrient adequacy renal transplant recipients; obesity; dietary diversity; nutrient adequacy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lin, I.-H.; Duong, T.V.; Nien, S.-W.; Tseng, I.-H.; Wang, H.-H.; Chiang, Y.-J.; Chen, C.-Y.; Wong, T.-C. Dietary Diversity Score: Implications for Obesity Prevention and Nutrient Adequacy in Renal Transplant Recipients. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5083. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145083

AMA Style

Lin I-H, Duong TV, Nien S-W, Tseng I-H, Wang H-H, Chiang Y-J, Chen C-Y, Wong T-C. Dietary Diversity Score: Implications for Obesity Prevention and Nutrient Adequacy in Renal Transplant Recipients. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(14):5083. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145083

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lin, I-Hsin, Tuyen V. Duong, Shih-Wei Nien, I-Hsin Tseng, Hsu-Han Wang, Yang-Jen Chiang, Chia-Yen Chen, and Te-Chih Wong. 2020. "Dietary Diversity Score: Implications for Obesity Prevention and Nutrient Adequacy in Renal Transplant Recipients" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 14: 5083. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17145083

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