Next Article in Journal
When I Breastfeed, It Feels as if my Soul Leaves the Body”: Maternal Capabilities for Healthy Child Growth in Rural Southeastern Tanzania
Next Article in Special Issue
Workload, Workaholism, and Job Performance: Uncovering Their Complex Relationship
Previous Article in Journal
Impact of Air Pollution on Asthma Outcomes
Previous Article in Special Issue
Unravelling Work Drive: A Comparison between Workaholism and Overcommitment
Article

Workaholism, Work Engagement and Child Well-Being: A Test of the Spillover-Crossover Model

1
Department of Policy Management, Keio University, 5322 Endo, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan
2
Center of Excellence for Positive Organizational Psychology, Erasmus University Rotterdam, P.O. Box 1738, 3000DR Rotterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Industrial Engineering & Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
4
Department of Global Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan
5
Department of Nursing, Kiryu University, 606 Azami, Kasakake-Cho, Midori, Gunma 379-2393, Japan
6
Institute of Social Sciences, Toyo University, 5-28-20, Hakusan, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 112-8606, Japan
7
Research Center for Overwork-Related Disorders, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, 6-21-1, Nagao, Tama-ku, Kawasaki 214-8585, Japan
8
Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University, 5322 Endo, Fujisawa, Kanagawa 252-0882, Japan
9
Community Health Nursing, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, 1-20-1, Handayama, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu 431-3192, Japan
10
Department of Mental Health, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6213; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176213
Received: 1 August 2020 / Revised: 22 August 2020 / Accepted: 24 August 2020 / Published: 27 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advancing Workaholism Research)
This study examines how working parents’ work attitudes (i.e., workaholism and work engagement) are associated with their child’s psychological well-being. Based on the Spillover-Crossover model (SCM), we hypothesize that (a) work-to-family spillover (i.e., work-to-family conflict and facilitation) and (b) employee happiness will sequentially mediate the relationship between parents’ work attitudes and their child’s emotional and behavioral problems. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Japanese dual-earner couples with pre-school child(ren). On the basis of valid data from 208 families, the hypothesized model was tested using structural equation modeling. For both fathers and mothers simultaneously, workaholism was positively related to work-to-family conflict, which, in turn, was negatively related to happiness. In contrast, work engagement was positively related to work-to-family facilitation, which, in turn, was positively related to happiness. Fathers’ and mothers’ happiness, in turn, were negatively related to their child’s emotional and behavioral problems. Results suggest that parents’ workaholism and work engagement are related to their child’s emotional and behavioral problems in opposite ways, whereby parents’ spillover and happiness mediate this relationship. These findings support the SCM and suggest that decreasing workaholism and improving work engagement may not only improve employees’ happiness, but also decrease their child’s emotional and behavioral problems. View Full-Text
Keywords: happiness; spillover-crossover model; workaholism; work engagement; work-family balance happiness; spillover-crossover model; workaholism; work engagement; work-family balance
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Shimazu, A.; Bakker, A.B.; Demerouti, E.; Fujiwara, T.; Iwata, N.; Shimada, K.; Takahashi, M.; Tokita, M.; Watai, I.; Kawakami, N. Workaholism, Work Engagement and Child Well-Being: A Test of the Spillover-Crossover Model. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176213

AMA Style

Shimazu A, Bakker AB, Demerouti E, Fujiwara T, Iwata N, Shimada K, Takahashi M, Tokita M, Watai I, Kawakami N. Workaholism, Work Engagement and Child Well-Being: A Test of the Spillover-Crossover Model. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(17):6213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176213

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shimazu, Akihito, Arnold B. Bakker, Evangelia Demerouti, Takeo Fujiwara, Noboru Iwata, Kyoko Shimada, Masaya Takahashi, Masahito Tokita, Izumi Watai, and Norito Kawakami. 2020. "Workaholism, Work Engagement and Child Well-Being: A Test of the Spillover-Crossover Model" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 17: 6213. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17176213

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop