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Article

Green Health Partnerships in Scotland; Pathways for Social Prescribing and Physical Activity Referral

1
School of Health and Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Sighthill Campus, Edinburgh EH11 4DN, UK
2
Sydney Nursing School, Charles Perkins Centre, Johns Hopkins Road, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6832; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186832
Received: 31 July 2020 / Revised: 8 September 2020 / Accepted: 16 September 2020 / Published: 18 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise Referral and Social Prescribing for Physical Activity)
Increased exposure to green space has many health benefits. Scottish Green Health Partnerships (GHPs) have established green health referral pathways to enable community-based interventions to contribute to primary prevention and the maintenance of health for those with established disease. This qualitative study included focus groups and semi-structured telephone interviews with a range of professionals involved in strategic planning for and the development and provision of green health interventions (n = 55). We explored views about establishing GHPs. GHPs worked well, and green health was a good strategic fit with public health priorities. Interventions required embedding into core planning for health, local authority, social care and the third sector to ensure integration into non-medical prescribing models. There were concerns about sustainability and speed of change required for integration due to limited funding. Referral pathways were in the early development stages and intervention provision varied. Participants recognised challenges in addressing equity, developing green health messaging, volunteering capacity and providing evidence of success. Green health interventions have potential to integrate successfully with social prescribing and physical activity referral. Participants recommended GHPs engage political and health champions, embed green health in strategic planning, target mental health, develop simple, positively framed messaging, provide volunteer support and implement robust routine data collection to allow future examination of success. View Full-Text
Keywords: green health; social prescribing; public health; physical activity referral; qualitative evaluation green health; social prescribing; public health; physical activity referral; qualitative evaluation
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MDPI and ACS Style

McHale, S.; Pearsons, A.; Neubeck, L.; Hanson, C.L. Green Health Partnerships in Scotland; Pathways for Social Prescribing and Physical Activity Referral. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6832. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186832

AMA Style

McHale S, Pearsons A, Neubeck L, Hanson CL. Green Health Partnerships in Scotland; Pathways for Social Prescribing and Physical Activity Referral. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(18):6832. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186832

Chicago/Turabian Style

McHale, Sheona, Alice Pearsons, Lis Neubeck, and Coral L. Hanson. 2020. "Green Health Partnerships in Scotland; Pathways for Social Prescribing and Physical Activity Referral" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 18: 6832. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17186832

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