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Article

Impact of Job Insecurity on Psychological Well- and Ill-Being among High Performance Coaches

1
Department of Teacher Education and Outdoor Life Studies, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, 0806 Oslo, Norway
2
School of Business, University of South-Eastern Norway, 3045 Drammen, Norway
3
Department of Performance and Training, The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, 11433 Stockholm, Sweden
4
The School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada
5
Karolinska Institute, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden
6
Department of Sport and Social Science, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, 0806 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 6939; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17196939
Received: 26 June 2020 / Revised: 3 September 2020 / Accepted: 19 September 2020 / Published: 23 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Wellbeing in the Sport Workforce)
Background: The evaluative nature of high performance (HP) sport fosters performance expectations that can be associated with harsh scrutiny, criticism, and job insecurity. In this context, (HP) sport is described as a highly competitive, complex, and turbulent work environment. The aim of this longitudinal, quantitative study was to explore whether HP coaches’ perceptions of job insecurity and job value incongruence in relation to work would predict their psychological well- and ill-being over time. Methods: HP coaches (n = 299) responded to an electronic questionnaire at the start, middle, and end of a competitive season, designed to measure the following: job insecurity, values, psychological well-being (vitality and satisfaction with work), and psychological ill-being (exhaustion and cynicism). Structural equation model analyses were conducted using Mplus. Results: Experiencing higher levels of job insecurity during the middle of the season significantly predicted an increase in coaches’ psychological ill-being, and a decrease in their psychological well-being at the end of the season. However, value incongruence did not have a significant longitudinal impact. Conclusions: These findings cumulatively indicate that coaches’ perceptions of job insecurity matter to their psychological health at work. Consequently, it is recommended that coaches and organizations acknowledge and discuss how to handle job security within the HP sport context. View Full-Text
Keywords: high performance coaches; job insecurity; values; psychological health high performance coaches; job insecurity; values; psychological health
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bentzen, M.; Kenttä, G.; Richter, A.; Lemyre, P.-N. Impact of Job Insecurity on Psychological Well- and Ill-Being among High Performance Coaches. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 6939. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17196939

AMA Style

Bentzen M, Kenttä G, Richter A, Lemyre P-N. Impact of Job Insecurity on Psychological Well- and Ill-Being among High Performance Coaches. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):6939. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17196939

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bentzen, Marte, Göran Kenttä, Anne Richter, and Pierre-Nicolas Lemyre. 2020. "Impact of Job Insecurity on Psychological Well- and Ill-Being among High Performance Coaches" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 19: 6939. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17196939

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