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Partners’ Relationship Mindfulness Promotes Better Daily Relationship Behaviours for Insecurely Attached Individuals

Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(19), 7267; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197267
Received: 30 August 2020 / Revised: 24 September 2020 / Accepted: 2 October 2020 / Published: 5 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Fostering Attachment Security)
Attachment anxiety and avoidance are generally associated with detrimental relationship processes, including more negative and fewer positive relationship behaviours. However, recent theoretical and empirical evidence has shown that positive factors can buffer insecure attachment. We hypothesised that relationship mindfulness (RM)—open or receptive attention to and awareness of what is taking place internally and externally in a current relationship—may promote better day-to-day behaviour for both anxious and avoidant individuals, as mindfulness improves awareness of automatic responses, emotion regulation, and empathy. In a dyadic daily experience study, we found that, while an individual’s own daily RM did not buffer the effects of their own insecure attachment on same-day relationship behaviours, their partner’s daily RM did, particularly for attachment avoidance. Our findings for next-day relationship behaviours, on the other hand, showed that lower (vs. higher) prior-day RM was associated with higher positive partner behaviours on the following day for avoidant individuals and those with anxious partners, showing this may be an attempt to “make up” for the previous day. These findings support the Attachment Security Enhancement Model and have implications for examining different forms of mindfulness over time and for mindfulness training. View Full-Text
Keywords: attachment; mindfulness; dyadic data; longitudinal; relationships attachment; mindfulness; dyadic data; longitudinal; relationships
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gazder, T.; Stanton, S.C.E. Partners’ Relationship Mindfulness Promotes Better Daily Relationship Behaviours for Insecurely Attached Individuals. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 7267. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197267

AMA Style

Gazder T, Stanton SCE. Partners’ Relationship Mindfulness Promotes Better Daily Relationship Behaviours for Insecurely Attached Individuals. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(19):7267. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197267

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gazder, Taranah, and Sarah C.E. Stanton 2020. "Partners’ Relationship Mindfulness Promotes Better Daily Relationship Behaviours for Insecurely Attached Individuals" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 19: 7267. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17197267

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