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Article

School-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents

Department of Social Sciences, University of Luxembourg, 4366 Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg
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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 598; https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17020598
Received: 2 December 2019 / Revised: 3 January 2020 / Accepted: 15 January 2020 / Published: 17 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Health and Wellbeing of Migrant Populations)
Although the school-class is known to be an important setting for adolescent risk behavior, little is known about how the ethnic composition of a school-class impacts substance use among pupils with a migration background. Moreover, the few existing studies do not distinguish between co-ethnic density (i.e., the share of immigrants belonging to one’s own ethnic group) and immigrant density (the share of all immigrants). This is all the more surprising since a high co-ethnic density can be expected to protect against substance use by increasing levels of social support and decreasing acculturative stress, whereas a high immigrant density can be expected to do the opposite by facilitating inter-ethnic conflict and identity threat. This study analyses how co-ethnic density and immigrant density are correlated with smoking among pupils of Portuguese origin in Luxembourg. A multi-level analysis is used to analyze data from the Luxembourg Health Behavior in School-Aged Children study (N = 4268 pupils from 283 classes). High levels of co-ethnic density reduced current smoking. In contrast, high levels of immigrant density increased it. Thus, in research on the health of migrants, the distinction between co-ethnic density and immigrant density should be taken into account, as both may have opposite effects. View Full-Text
Keywords: migration; smoking; substance use; adolescence; ethnic density; ethnic composition; school-class; multilevel analysis; HBSC; acculturative stress migration; smoking; substance use; adolescence; ethnic density; ethnic composition; school-class; multilevel analysis; HBSC; acculturative stress
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kern, M.R.; Heinz, A.; Willems, H.E. School-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 598. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17020598

AMA Style

Kern MR, Heinz A, Willems HE. School-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(2):598. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17020598

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kern, Matthias R., Andreas Heinz, and Helmut E. Willems 2020. "School-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17, no. 2: 598. https://0-doi-org.brum.beds.ac.uk/10.3390/ijerph17020598

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